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Lagering delay

I made the mistake of starting a lager with an empty pipeline and now my fermenting chamber is occupied and i have to wait until its done before i brew another batch…question is can i just finish primary/D rest, keg it and lager it at a later time? I figure i can brew up some quick turnaround ales fill the pipeline then lager this batch so i have some beers while its lagering and hogging the ferm chamber for 3 months…some people say you can lager for 1 month but i want to go minimum 3 months for extended storage…so thats my dilemma… any advice will be cool

I do this all the time. I lager in kegs, and only have room in my keg fridge for 2. Also, sometimes I get busy and just don’t have time to deal with beer stuff. So I’ve had finished lagers sit in the primary weeks or even months past when they were ready before I get around to lagering them. As near as I can tell it doesn’t hurt anything. They stay in my cool basement (upper 50s) which probably helps. Its probably not the ideal way of doing things, but I still end up with good beer. As usual, RDWHAHB.

You can do this, and in addition, I haven’t found any ill effects from interrupting a lagering to use my ferm fridge for a quick turnaround ale. Most of the beers I brew are with US-05, WY3711, and Nottingham, all of which only really need temp control for the first 3 days, then you can raise them up to ambient room temp to finish up for 7-10 days, thus freeing up your fridge. So you would only really need to stop lagering for a couple of days assuming you are brewing these types of beers for your quick turnarounds.

Well i listened to peoples advice and all i can say is DO NOT DELAY A LAGER…It was a tasty beer at first and now its a keg full of urine…keep your lager on schedule and fill the pipe line before brewing a lager…Not saying other people did not have success but i sure a shit did not…cheers…what a waste

Can you explain this a little. What did you do? Why was it a problem? Not sure what you mean by delaying a lager.

Can you explain this a little. What did you do? Why was it a problem? Not sure what you mean by delaying a lager.[/quote]
I did a primary for my lager until i reached FG then i left it out at room temp to free up my ferm chamber to brew some quick turnarounds and when i went to check on the lager i drew a small sample and it was putrid (given it was room temp) but totally different character…last week it was great and did not even get lagered yet…it just got bad and i blame it on not keeping it on schedule

Can you explain this a little. What did you do? Why was it a problem? Not sure what you mean by delaying a lager.[/quote]
I did a primary for my lager until i reached FG then i left it out at room temp to free up my ferm chamber to brew some quick turnarounds and when i went to check on the lager i drew a small sample and it was putrid (given it was room temp) but totally different character…last week it was great and did not even get lagered yet…it just got bad and i blame it on not keeping it on schedule[/quote]

I hope this doesn’t happen to me. Yesterday I kegged a lager that had a 3 week D-rest.

I hope this doesn’t happen to me. Yesterday I kegged a lager that had a 3 week D-rest.[/quote]

My advice get that sucker @ 35*F asap

If its truly “putrid” that probably means infection. An extra week or two at room temp isn’t your culprit. What temperature are you talking about exactly? Oxidation is maybe possible if you had it way to warm or somehow aerated it post fermentation.

Autolysis reportedly tastes and smells REALLY nasty (never experienced it) but shouldn’t have been an issue if you pitched plenty of healthy yeast.

Very sorry your beer went south, but I strongly suspect you should look at other aspects of your process besides the extra delay.

[quote=“Nate42”]If its truly “putrid” that probably means infection. An extra week or two at room temp isn’t your culprit. What temperature are you talking about exactly? Oxidation is maybe possible if you had it way to warm or somehow aerated it post fermentation.

Autolysis reportedly tastes and smells REALLY nasty (never experienced it) but shouldn’t have been an issue if you pitched plenty of healthy yeast.

Very sorry your beer went south, but I strongly suspect you should look at other aspects of your process besides the extra delay.[/quote]

No it was not infected…its not sour or have any flavors like that…doubt i under pitched cause i used a 2L slurry for a 1050 beer…it was just bad brewing practice that caused this…but thank you for chiming in…cheers

I have the same process as you describe and have never had that happen. Strange.

I’ve delayed lagering before too with no ill effects. Essentially all it amounts to is an extended d-rest. There are a variety of off flavors from infections. Kegs can be difficult to sanitize completely, especially the posts.

+1. I would bet its something else.

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