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Lagering bottles

If I were to bottle a lager I would prime the bottles then keep them warm enough to carbonate. Then lager them. Is this correct.

Yes that is correct! But sometimes when all my kegs are in use I will cold crash/ lager it till one opens up. I brew pretty often and have had some lagering for months. Then decided to bottle it with no problems carb just fine and Crystal clear beer every time.

I’m trying to get the least amount of sediment in the bottles. Apart from bottleing off the keg which method do you think works best.

If you want the least amount of sediments in bottles I would bulk lager first then bottle condition. I’ve never lagered after bottling before so this is the only way I do it.

If you want the least amount of sediments in bottles I would bulk lager first then bottle condition. I’ve never lagered after bottling before so this is the only way I do it.[/quote]

Do you bulk lager in a secondary or the primary?

Secondary. I usually transfer around 10-14 days after I pitch my yeast and verify fermentation is complete. I’ll then drop to lager temps for 3-4 weeks then bottle. I usually add Biofine Clear to the secondary as I’m transferring to help clear it up.

If you want the least amount of sediments in bottles I would bulk lager first then bottle condition. I’ve never lagered after bottling before so this is the only way I do it.[/quote]

Do you bulk lager in a secondary or the primary?[/quote]
This is one of the few situations where a secondary is warranted. My favorite secondary for lagering is a keg, and you can get close to zero sediment if you bottle carbonated beer from the keg. But if you don’t want to go that route, then you can rack from secondary to bottling bucket, prime and bottle as per normal and only end up with a thin layer of sediment on the bottom of the bottles. If you lager for more than a couple months, you might want to consider adding a bit of fresh yeast to the beer before bottling.

[quote=“rebuiltcellars”]
This is one of the few situations where a secondary is warranted. My favorite secondary for lagering is a keg, and you can get close to zero sediment if you bottle carbonated beer from the keg. But if you don’t want to go that route, then you can rack from secondary to bottling bucket, prime and bottle as per normal and only end up with a thin layer of sediment on the bottom of the bottles. If you lager for more than a couple months, you might want to consider adding a bit of fresh yeast to the beer before bottling.[/quote]
So if I lager my batch in secondary for a month and I want to bottle a gallon and the rest goes to keg, I need to prime my bottles then store them at room temp to condition?

[quote=“brentconn”][quote=“rebuiltcellars”]
This is one of the few situations where a secondary is warranted. My favorite secondary for lagering is a keg, and you can get close to zero sediment if you bottle carbonated beer from the keg. But if you don’t want to go that route, then you can rack from secondary to bottling bucket, prime and bottle as per normal and only end up with a thin layer of sediment on the bottom of the bottles. If you lager for more than a couple months, you might want to consider adding a bit of fresh yeast to the beer before bottling.[/quote]
So if I lager my batch in secondary for a month and I want to bottle a gallon and the rest goes to keg, I need to prime my bottles then store them at room temp to condition?[/quote]
Exactly right. I do this frequently - bottle about 1/4 of the batch and keg the remainder.

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