Lager in keg

I did a BIB of a pee water lite lager. Used s23 dry yeast. Only 6lb pils, 3Oz acidulated, and a pound of corn sugar. 1 Oz. Tettananger 60 min. After 2 weeks at 50F it was at 1.002. Tasted it side by side to a 3.2% (sold in Oklahoma) Natural Lite. I was the same pee water color but tasted way better only very watery as does Natural. At least it had a malty flavor. No diacetyl. I racked it into a keg and put it in my kegger. Will it lager ok like that? I think I’ll go ahead and put co2 on it. I have friends that like the stuff so I made one. Never had made a lager before so I used my kegger to ferment since it was empty at the time. Just wasn’t sure if lagering in the keg was ok and thought I’d post this if someone wanted a “Lite” beer. BTW, had some friends over that had never had home brew. They polished of an entire keg of NB’s Irish Red in a couple hours. That’s why I had an empty kegger to use as a fermentation chamber.

Yes, lagering in a keg works fine. You might want to pull the first pint or two to clear the yeast and then jumper it over into a fresh keg once it’s ready to serve.

What’s the best way to do that Shadetree? I have never done it.

Flush the receiving keg with CO2 and then twist the pressure-relief to the open position (this will keep a CO2 blanket in the keg and allow the keg to fill). If the beer is carbed, pull a pint to clear the yeast, then release the head pressure in the beer keg and use two beer disconnects on a short piece of hose to link the two keg’s beer diptubes. If the beer isn’t carbed, use CO2 to dispense before you use the jumper. The beer will probably start flowing a little on it’s own since there will be pressure in the headspace (if it was carbed), but you’ll need to apply a little CO2 to the full keg to keep it flowing. Watch the hose and pull a disconnect when you see trub.

Use two liquid connectors and a beer line hook onto the liquid post on the full keg then hook the other one onto the other liquid post on the empty keg. Make sure you purged the empty keg with Co2 first then using Co2 on the first keg push the beer from one keg to the other if you use a lid you will have to let the pressure out as you go.

I believe this is how its done someone can correct me if im wrong.

You beat me :stuck_out_tongue:

Lagering in a keg works fine. Like Shadetree said, you’ll want to pull a first pint to clear any sediment from the lagering keg and jumper the beer to a serving keg. The way to do that is to make a short beer line jumper with beer (out) QDs on both ends. Purge the empty keg with CO2. Then, connect the jumper to the beer (out) posts on both kegs. Use CO2 to push the beer from the lagering keg into the serving keg through the dip tube (fill from the bottom). You only need enough CO2 pressure to push the beer - around 3-5 PSI should do it. Use the pressure relief valve on the empty keg top help manage flow rate. Basically, it’s a lot like a giant counter-pressure bottle filler.

This works best with beer that hasn’t been carbonated yet. You can do it with carbonated beer, but it’s more difficult to do without off-gassing a lot of the CO2 from the carbonated beer and creating a lot of foam. My practice is to transfer from the primary to the lagering keg, purge the headspace with CO2, pressurize the keg to 20-30 PSI to be sure the lid is sealed, then disconnect it from the CO2 and put it in my lagering fridge. When lagering is done, I push the beer to the serving keg and force carbonate.

If you’re going to do a lot of lagers (I do) you can make a dedicated lagering keg by cutting the dip tube 3/4" to 1" short. That leaves room in the bottom for sediment and you usually don’t have to blow off a pint at transfer time. I make enough lagers that I have three dedicated lagering kegs that are almost always full. There’s also nothing to keep you from using a lagering keg as a “normal” serving keg - you’ll just leave a pint or so behind when the keg blows. Or, you can get a spare dip tube if you want to switch back and forth.

The only reason you would need to jumper it to a new keg is if you are going to take the keg on the road. Then jumpering it to a new keg will keep the sediment from going back into solution and clouding the beer.

If you are going to leave the keg in the fridge and serve it, the 1st beer poured for the 1st week or so will be a little cloudy. After 2 weeks it will be clear. This is just the little sediment that settles at the base of the dip tube.

[quote=“Nighthawk”]The only reason you would need to jumper it to a new keg is if you are going to take the keg on the road. Then jumpering it to a new keg will keep the sediment from going back into solution and clouding the beer.

If you are going to leave the keg in the fridge and serve it, the 1st beer poured for the 1st week or so will be a little cloudy. After 2 weeks it will be clear. This is just the little sediment that settles at the base of the dip tube.[/quote]

I guess I wouldn’t know if my lagers could be cleaner or get ready faster if I did a keg-to-keg transfer, but I agree that it isn’t really necessary.

Every lager I’ve made has been conditioned in the keg and I’ve been quite happy with the Dorts, pils, helles, octoberfest, doppelbocks, and American lagers I’ve made. I do cut the dip tubes, but I use the same technique for my ales as well…