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L.E.D. lighting for beer transfer?

Does anyone know if L.E.D. lighting is safer than Fluorescent type, or Sun light, for safe beer with yeast, transferring into another vessel?
Transferring wort into the fermenter without the yeast added yet, usually is no problem. It’s when you have yeast that makes it skunk when light hits it.
I am considering changing the tubes in my garage fluorescent lamps, to L.E.D. for this and the long life of the L.E.D. Do away with the ballasts that have short life span. And work in cold temperatures.
Tapping the knowledge base of this great forum.

As long as you aren’t exposing your beer to a constant light source you shouldn’t have a problem. It is extended exposure to light that will skunk the beer. Just having lights on (any kind of light) while transferring you beer shouldn’t cause any kind of issues.

First thing you need to know is hops skunks the beer, not yeast. Second, it depends on the LED’s spectrum. Florescents generally are pretty wide spectrum, LEDs vary. Either way, the difference in one white light over another will be minimal. Make the switch if you like, I love my LED lighting, but it is unlikely to change your beer.

+1… it’s the light + hops and not the yeast that skunks a beer. And it sounds like you’re coming up with a solution to something that isn’t a problem.

Very good. [quote]The reasons why light is so damaging to your beer gets technical fast, but basically, the light causes alpha-acids (the key component of hops) to break down and combine with other chemicals in beer to create 3-methyl-2-butene-1-thiol, a sulfur-containing substance which produces the strong sulfur smell which is extremely similar to isopentyl mercaptan, or skunk spray.[/quote]
Source: http://blog.beeriety.com/2009/06/29/sku … it-happen/

I don’t think he’s saying that the yeast skunks. But skunking happens post fermentation, so after yeast is added. But obviously not immediately.

Sure happens pretty immediately when I’m sitting outside with a beer in a clear glass. But when racking to a keg, it’s nothing to worry yourself about.

Sure happens pretty immediately when I’m sitting outside with a beer in a clear glass. But when racking to a keg, it’s nothing to worry yourself about.[/quote]

Yeah, but that’s post fermentation. IIRC, there are compounds created during fermentation that promote skunking. Yes, the OP was talking bout post fermentation. I was just trying to clear up the comments about yeast.

Thanks for the input, fellow brewers! I was certain there would be intelligent replies.

Yes, I have had beer in a clear mug, go skunky in just minutes, sitting in the sunshine, sipping a cool one after work, on a warm sunny day. Even with a nice head of foam on top.
I had not even considered it could be the hops. I thought wort was ok, until yeast was added and fermented to beer. I’ll be more careful with my wort, with hops added now… :oops:

I suppose transferring into kegs, so far, must have not been in direct light too long, as it goes through my 1/2 inch clear plastic racking cane and clear tubing. Of coarse I keep the lid of the fermenter balancing on top, and the inside of the keg is in a shadow.

I am leaning towards doing the swap to L.E.D tubes to replace my fluorescent tubes.

Thanks all, 'till you’re better paid!

[quote=“Traveler733”]I had not even considered it could be the hops. I thought wort was ok, until yeast was added and fermented to beer. I’ll be more careful with my wort, with hops added now… :oops:
[/quote]

You’re fine if the wort hasn’t been fermented yet. The yeast provide the sulfur required to make the reaction between the iso-AA’s from boiled hops and UV light. No yeast = no skunk

Thanks for your reply.
That makes more sense. The yeast and hops together, making the beer go skunky.
Now, i’ll transfer to kegs in the shade or shadow.

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