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Keg Carbing Naturally?

sorry if this has been touched on many times, I’m interested in all of your opinoins. Brew in keg and add my priming solution with my Kolsch at room temp for approximately 2 weeks allowing to carb naturally. I understand that the beer will keep longer at cold temps so I plan on moving to 33* or so at that point. My question is do I release the pressure, or most of it at this point? or do I release it just prior to putting it on tap and then allowing my 11-12 psi push to beer out of the keezer? My custom keezer has only room for 2 kegs ( huge miscalculation at build time) and I’d like to remove the lag time on replacement kegs as it takes approximately 10 days or so to carb with the set it and forget it method. and im not interested in upping my setting to 25 or 30 psi and rolling it on the floor, as I have limited time for to work with. thanks in advance.

Leave it under pressure until you are ready to serve.

I use priming sugar in all my kegs. Always have a couple ready to go. Use 1/2 what you would for bottling. Release pressure when you’re ready to hook it up to the gas.

Have you cut the end of the out tubes?

I don’t see a need to cut the dip tubes. so the 1st 1/2 glass is yeast. Toss and fill the next glass.

Which brings the added benefit of being able to move the keg without rousing all that yeast.

interesting… I’ve been wanting to try naturally carbing in the keg… more so just to experiment than anything else. But I’ve always stopped because of not wanting to cut the dip tube… Thanks!

Which brings the added benefit of being able to move the keg without rousing all that yeast.[/quote]

How often do you move kegs around? The yeast/trub will still be in suspension for a few hours and thus will make it into the glass.

If you are really frugal (cheap like me) you can pour a glass and let it sit to settle the yeast out for 5 minutes. In the mean time, pour another 1/4-1/2 glass to enjoy.

Someone made a solution to a minimal problem IMO.

Which brings the added benefit of being able to move the keg without rousing all that yeast.[/quote]

How often do you move kegs around? The yeast/trub will still be in suspension for a few hours and thus will make it into the glass.

If you are really frugal (cheap like me) you can pour a glass and let it sit to settle the yeast out for 5 minutes. In the mean time, pour another 1/4-1/2 glass to enjoy.

Someone made a solution to a minimal problem IMO.[/quote]

We’re in agreement. :slight_smile:

I meant that I pull a glass with a full-length dip tube before I move from secondary/lagering. On rare occasions, I take a keg or two in the car to an event. It’s nice to be able to start serving immediately and know the beer will be clear.

I don’t think you need to relieve pressure (unless you over-primed/over-carb’d it).

If it was at the correct pressure warm for the volumes of CO2 you want, it will drop to the correct pressure cold for that same volume of CO2. That’s how it works with a sealed bottle, and I’ve monitored pressure on my naturally carb’d mini-kegs and I see the exact relationship I expect (right from the temperature/pressure/volume tables). Practice has met theory on this one for me.

-kenc

[quote=“Gruneun”]

We’re in agreement. :slight_smile:

I meant that I pull a glass with a full-length dip tube before I move from secondary/lagering. On rare occasions, I take a keg or two in the car to an event. It’s nice to be able to start serving immediately and know the beer will be clear.[/quote]

Oops! I misunderstood your comment. re-reading it I can see where you were going. :oops:

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