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Is 34/70 normally this slow to start?

I use a bubbler so I can see the bottom but there is so much break proteins in this one that I can’t tell what’s yeast and whats break material. I am however not seeing any bubbles in the airlock or any sign that C02 has disrupted the surface of the liquid.

This is only my second lager so I my expectations aren’t anything other than what I got with my last one where I had about an inch krausen at the top within 24 hours but that was with a liquid yeast with a 2 step starter so it’s hard to compare the two.

If you pitched 75F yeast into 50F wort then you may have temperature shocked the yeast. A certain population may not have survived, so it would take longer to grow a population that will ferment the wort.

I sure hope not since that is the exact process that fermentis says to use for rehydrating their yeast (69-77F)

http://www.brewwithfermentis.com/tips-tricks/yeast-rehydration/

Yea, but they forgot to mention that the temperature of the yeast slurry and wort should be within 5-10 degrees of each other, preferably the yeast temperature should be spot on or a little cooler than the wort.

This is what’s called “cold pitching.” Applies to ales and lagers, but lagers tend to have that high temperature differential.

Cold yeast into warm wort = ok
Warm yeast into cold wort = not too good depending on temperature differential

Think of you coming in from the cold. It feels good to warm up.

Now imagine a nice summer day and you dump a bucket of ice water on yourself… or take a polar plunge.

Your body welcomes the warming from the cold, but not the instant cold from the warmth.

This link may help give you some guidelines:

http://www.brewboard.com/index.php?showtopic=26969

Can’t recall if the “Yeast” book the “Lagers” book (or both) discuss this… have to look when @ home.

The problem arises though getting the yeast slurry down to the proper temp. If you get it down to temp quickly you are shocking it. If you don’t, you are letting rehydrated yeast sit in straight water for possibly hours in to get it down to the proper temp which I have heard is also bad for the health of the yeast.

Lesser of two evils in this scenario?

[quote=“mattnaik”]The problem arises though getting the yeast slurry down to the proper temp. If you get it down to temp quickly you are shocking it. If you don’t, you are letting rehydrated yeast sit in straight water for possibly hours in to get it down to the proper temp which I have heard is also bad for the health of the yeast.

Lesser of two evils in this scenario?[/quote]

For dry yeast, after rehydration, simply put it in the refrigerator until it’s at pitching temp. Might take an hour or two depending your refrigerator, which really shouldn’t shock the yeast. (Make sure to keep stirring it.)

For liquid yeast starters, always refrigerate at least 24 hours before pitching and decant just prior to pitching.

[quote=“mattnaik”][quote=“jd14t”]
As long as the yeast is multiplying and is the dominant organism you should be ok sanitation wise.[/quote]

I’m was more concerned about under-attenuation and off flavors from under-pitching (if it was in-fact and under-pitch and not just a really slow lag time for some other reason).[/quote]

I’m sure it will attenuate just fine. I’m more concerned about contaminated flavors. Yeah, if it’s not near high krauesen then I’d recommend pitching more yeast.

The term “bottom-fermenting” is bullcrap and drives me up the wall. Ales and lagers ferment on the bottom, the top, and everyplace in between. You will see a krausen with all lagers. It might not be as prominent as with ales, but it’s there. Otherwise, something is wrong.

Well got home to about an inch of nice white foamy krausen. Almost exactly 72 hours after pitching.

glad to see its perking away. its nerve racking waiting on this yeast but it has always finished for me at my intended FG.

The only time that I’ve used this yeast was on a three gallon batch of 1.049 German pilsner. I pitched one pack of yeast straight into the carboy with the wort at 54f. I put the carboy in the cooler set at 50f and had action the next morning.

Just an update on this: this yeast does EVERYTHING slow. It’s just over 7 days till I saw krausen and 10 since I pitched and there is still a nice healthy krausen and a TON of yeast in suspension. I tasted a little of it yesterday to see if there is any diacetyl and its still quite sweet to the taste so lots more work for those guys to do. I didn’t do a gravity reading cause i know it’s got a long way to go just by tasting it.

A little worried about this stalling and was thinking of boosting the temp a little. It’s currently hovering between 50 and 51 right now. Has anyone had success with this yeast at higher temps like mid to high 50’s or would I be risking too much ester production at those temps?

I actually think that is a good trait in a lager yeast. But I do find this to be true of 34/70. I never found the fermentation process to be much longer than usual (most beers I make are lagers), but it sure can take its time clearing out perfectly- even when cold crashing.

[quote=“mattnaik”]Just an update on this: this yeast does EVERYTHING slow. It’s just over 7 days till I saw krausen and 10 since I pitched and there is still a nice healthy krausen and a TON of yeast in suspension. I tasted a little of it yesterday to see if there is any diacetyl and its still quite sweet to the taste so lots more work for those guys to do. I didn’t do a gravity reading cause i know it’s got a long way to go just by tasting it.

A little worried about this stalling and was thinking of boosting the temp a little. It’s currently hovering between 50 and 51 right now. Has anyone had success with this yeast at higher temps like mid to high 50’s or would I be risking too much ester production at those temps?[/quote]

I often raise the temp of fermentation once 70% attenuation has a cured. I just bump the temp to about 60f for d-rest.

I never ferment this yeast under 55, for these very reasons.

Once you pitch enough healthy yeast from a slurry 1/2 or so for the same size batch, this yeast will ferment fine at 48F. I make lots with this and 2206, 800, 802 and others. I just start with small batches and build up with the liquid yeasts. 34/70 is the different one, as I only pitch 2 sachets in 10 gallons, but I carefully rehydrate and get it below pitching temp before pitching - that might take a couple of hours, but then it usually shows some signs of good activity with 48 hours or so. The beer turns out fine and I don’t taste any stress-related off flavors. It will take some time to clear, though.

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