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Invert Sugar to boost alcohol

has anyone used invert sugar (it’s basically home made corn sugar) then it’s put into primary fermentation after Krausen. It’s supposed to boost alcohol, I’ve never heard of putting a sugar in primary after krausen, but that’s what my buddies recipe called for (it’s a saison - btw). Is it weird that it wouldn’t go in the boil? the process for making the sugar does include boiling the sugar, so there is a low risk of infection, I just think it’s a little weird.
thoughts?
Scott.

I do that for a belgian golden strong. The reason I do that is so that the yeast have time to chew their way thru the more complex sugars before getting gorged on the simple. I have done that on 2 batches so far and will again on a third. I like the results, but I will say i use cane sugar boiled in water for 15 min.

does it affect the flavor or just boost alcohol? seems like a simple sugar wouldn’t add much flavor. what are the benefits of adding it to fermentation?

Thanks response, btw. I’ve never heard of adding more sugar to ferm.

[quote=“Gr8abe”]does it affect the flavor or just boost alcohol? seems like a simple sugar wouldn’t add much flavor. what are the benefits of adding it to fermentation?

Thanks response, btw. I’ve never heard of adding more sugar to ferm.[/quote]

Nope, no flavor. And corn sugar is not inverted. I’ve never found any advantage to using invert sugar. You can certainly add it to the fermenter, but I’ve never found any advantage to that, either.

Corn sugar is already a monosacharide, glucose. Inverting sucrose gives you glucose and fructose, the two components that are linked together in sucrose. Yeast have an invertase enzyme though so they can accomplish this themselves.

Adding sugar doesn’t add flavor per se unless you count the warming hotness from alcohol. Higher alcohol content does change the character of a beer.

I had been making it to add to an ESB recipe, then I got a few Lyle’s Golden Syrup tins. Frankly adding table sugar does the same thing. But watch out for cidery flavors if you add too much! Anymore I rarely boost the alcohol content this way - I’d rather just add some base malt to a recipe if it needs a little boost…

Like Denny, Tom, and ynotbrusome mentioned it does not add any flavor per say. What I feel it does add is a body/mouthfeel from the added alcohol coupled with a lighter malt body and yeast character. The beer I use this on is a Duvel clone and if you have ever had it it is delish.

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