How Much -WLP007 Dry English Ale Yeast

Hello, I am still rather new to the brewing process and had a question about the WLP007 Dry English Ale Yeast since I have never used it before. Is it ok to just use one vial of this for a 5 gallon batch? I am not making any starter with it, I just planned on pitching the vial direct to the fermentor…

Thanks for any help!

It will probably get the job done, but it may have a longer lag time. Also, the yeast may be stressed after this batch, so if you harvest yeast, it may underperform. Making a starter would be your best bet, and it isn’t tough to do. If you have a couple of days before brew day, I would look into it.

BTW, what’s the SG of the brew you plan on doing?

Like I said, I am still new. this is actually my first 5 gallon batch.
Not sure about a starter. I guess I’ll read up! :slight_smile:
the starting gravity is 1.054.

So just the one vial will do on it’s own but best to make a starter with it?

One packet should be fine with that OG. Making a starter from dry yeast can be done but it is much more common with liquid yeast which typically will have much lower cell counts. Rehydrating or not is a whole 'nother topic. I usually don’t…

[quote=“zephed666”]Like I said, I am still new. this is actually my first 5 gallon batch.
Not sure about a starter. I guess I’ll read up! :slight_smile:
the starting gravity is 1.054.

So just the one vial will do on it’s own but best to make a starter with it?[/quote]
I think it will get it done. You will have a bit more lag time, but if sanitization is good, no problems

thanks everyone!

It’s not a dry yeast it’s liquid from white labs. The “dry” means it will finish dry, it has high attunation.

Above noted. Then my answer still applies. I would make a starter with liquid yeast even a “dry” liquid yeast :stuck_out_tongue:
He will make better beer with a better pitch rate if he does.

I was reading up on starters. just quick overviews…
If I were to make one, would I use 2 cups of water to 1/2 cup of dme?

And I have some extra pilsen light DME that I will be using for my brew.
Is it ok to use that for the starter?

Using this yeast:

http://www.northernbrewer.com/shop/wl-dry-english-ale

Thanks again!

When I make a starter, I use 2.5(ish) oz of DME to 800mls of water. That gives me an OG of 1.025 or so for the starter wort. Sometimes this is just enough (assuming that you are working with a fresh batch of yeast that was purchased or harvested from a previous batch) to get them active very quickly and start reproducing without stressing the cells by producing much alcohol. I’ve made many this way with excellent results and quick onset of fermentation.

To answer your question…yes…the DME you have will be fine I would think.

Keep in mind that the yeast you are working with is VERY thick. Like Cottage Cheese. Start shaking that vial (gradually loosening the cap too) early and often to get it back into suspension.

So I should shake the yeast to get it active before adding to the starter wort?
I have a 1 gallon jug I used to ferment. Can I use that for the container of the starter wort?
And just use a piece of aluminum foil on top and leave for 24 hours (shaking occasionally) before I pitch to the brew wort?

thanks!

[quote=“zephed666”]Hello, I am still rather new to the brewing process and had a question about the WLP007 Dry English Ale Yeast since I have never used it before. Is it ok to just use one vial of this for a 5 gallon batch? I am not making any starter with it, I just planned on pitching the vial direct to the fermentor…

Thanks for any help![/quote]

I brew three gallon batches and use one [i]really[[i] fresh pack for 1.050 or so, but much higher or a larger batch really needs a starter.

The size starter you need depends on the age/vitality of your yeast. This link will give you the age of your vial of yeast.

https://www.yeastman.com/Login/Public/R ... esult.aspx

Here are links to two pitch rate/starter calculators I like to use. The first calculator has an over build option. This will show how large to build a starter to brew your beer with and be able to save some of the fresh yeast, from the starter, for future brewing.

http://www.homebrewdad.com/yeast_calculator.php http://www.brewersfriend.com/yeast-pitc ... alculator/

[quote=“zephed666”]So I should shake the yeast to get it active before adding to the starter wort?
I have a 1 gallon jug I used to ferment. Can I use that for the container of the starter wort?
And just use a piece of aluminum foil on top and leave for 24 hours (shaking occasionally) before I pitch to the brew wort?

thanks![/quote]

Not to get it active…but the vile that I had of 007 was really packed in there…took a LOT of shaking to break it up. But, be warned…if you don’t gradually release the pressure in the vile, when you open it, it could spray. Crack it open slowly and release the pressure after a few shakes. You’ll thank me later.

A one gallon jug, while large for a starter like this, will work if you don’t have anything else to use. I use a 2 L flask and I only cover it with sanitized foil. I did buy a stir plate for my starters now, but you don’t HAVE to have one to create a starter. I’ve made plenty without one. I just gave it a swirl every time I walked by to ensure that oxygen was getting mixed in. Good luck

thanks again!
I’ll be making it this Friday. Hope to brew on Saturday.

Last question, if I brew on Friday, can I leave the wort overnight without pitching the yeast and just pitch it when the starter is done? Figure they would both be at the identical temp as well…

Usually it is best to make the starter before you brew. I usually make mine a few days before I brew so I can let it ferment out, then I put it in the fridge for a day or so in order to let all the yeast settle. Then I dump the spent starter wort out (except just a tad bit to be able to swirl the yeast). When ready to pitch, I swirl the yeast up and dump it in. You can also just pitch the whole starter while it is active, which might take about 24 hours.

[quote=“zephed666”]thanks again!
I’ll be making it this Friday. Hope to brew on Saturday.

Last question, if I brew on Friday, can I leave the wort overnight without pitching the yeast and just pitch it when the starter is done? Figure they would both be at the identical temp as well…[/quote]

Yes, you can do this. Technique is called, “no chill brewing”. Carefully seal up the wort. Keep everything sanitized very well.

If you can leave the wort in the boil kettle, and sealed, hope debris will be compacted on the bottom when you get ready t pour into the fermentor.

So I made my starter tonight. Hopefully I did it right. It was the first starter I ever made.
I used brewer’s friend to figure it as recommended:

http://www.brewersfriend.com/yeast-pitc ... alculator/

My wort will be 1.054 OG and 5 gallons.
The yeast lot was made 5/24/15.
So I read it to read only 72 billions viable cells.
My target pitch rate was set at .75 (Ale)

My starter was 1.6 liters with 6.4 oz of the pilsen light DME - shaking method.

I hope that is correct. I plan to pitch in about 36 hours…

Does this seem correct? :slight_smile:

Thanks again!

You will need 666 billion cells for this beer \m/ :twisted:

Must be one devil of a beer. :cheers: