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Hop Timing

I am a little confused about adding hops at sixty minutes on a sixty minute boil. Is it a brief dunk or do I leave the nylon hop bag in throughout the chill and remove just prior to to putting wort into the fermenter? I understand the hopping schedule as described in the instructions but it’s not clear to me on the last hopping at sixty minutes. Thanks Larry

If you are doing a 60 minute boil(the most common time), the 60 minute addition is added as soon as you achieve a boil. Then start the timer. The countdown then progresses to zero. Any additions (20 minute, 10 minute, etc) happens when you have that amount of time left to go. The last addition would typically be at zero (also known as flameout). Leave all the hop additions in there until after you’ve chilled it down to pitching temperature. Then you can remove them if you used hop bags, filter them out with a kitchen colander, or just dump the whole thing in your fermenter.

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I didn’t ask that question properly. Sorry. My question concerned the hop additions at flameout, and you have addressed that for me. Will try to think out the question a little better next time I have one. Thanks jimrmaine

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Spot on Jim, spot on!! Sneezles61

Further on your question, you can do what is called a HOP STAND. Flame out, then add your hops either in a bag or directly into the kettle. Lightly place a lid over the pot and let set for a period of time, 20 minutes is common. You don’t want the temp to drop below 160 degrees or you begin to run the risk of gathering bacteria and possibly getting an infection. The DANGER ZONE is estimated to be between 160 degrees and 80 degrees; however, bacteria can survive below 80 and above 160. Also, hop isomerization begins to stop at temps 175 degrees and below. If you do a hop stand, it’s best you do your time(20 min) and immediately chill. As for leaving the hops in or taking them out, you can do either. It depends on the amount of trub and hops you have and if you are going to screen it or filter the wort. Some people want to get as much wort off of the trub ASAP, some folks will deal with it after fermenting. I suggest doing it sooner. The trub and any excess hops your wort is setting on will lead to off flavors and will make it harder to produce a clear beer. Hope this helps

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Also, I was just in a conversation with a few others covering a HOP topic. It’s under the Northern Brewer forum labeled “Absent hop flavor and aroma.” I think you’ll find that convo interesting as it sort of relates to your question. I had a lot of really good responses to my question

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