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Hop stand + dry hop

Figured I’d start a new thread since I am now going to be keeping the dry hop part of my thing now. Last IPA was best IPA to date. Twas a little drier than I wanted but pretty darn happy with how it turned out hop wise.

On deck tonight:

90% pale
5% 60L crystal
5% carapils

1.075 or so

12oz 30 minute hop stand using a blend
4oz dry hop with blend

Hop blend is a total of 16oz: 8oz centennial, 4oz cascade, 4oz chinook

Chico at 68F or so.

For the first time I will be aiming a tad higher pH wise, like 5.5. In the past I really liked the brightness I get from lower pH of 5.3 or so but I am thinking this was making the beer a tad too dry. Hoping this change does not detract from the hop mojo but am expecting a little more bitterness to come through. BTW, calculated IBU using a 15 minute addition is well over 250…

:cheers:

Sounds like a tasty hop bomb. I’ve been experimenting with mash temps to determine fg of many of my IPAs lately. It’s been fun.

Thanks. Tasty hop bomb I hope!

I have come to the conclusion that mash pH trumps temp in determining FG. IE: I’ve mashed at 158F with 10% crystal and get dry beer.

[quote=“zwiller”]Figured I’d start a new thread since I am now going to be keeping the dry hop part of my thing now.
[/quote]

Just so I am clear, you do not add any hops until flame out? Nothing at 60 or 30 mins?

[quote=“560sdl”][quote=“zwiller”]Figured I’d start a new thread since I am now going to be keeping the dry hop part of my thing now.
[/quote]

Just so I am clear, you do not add any hops until flame out? Nothing at 60 or 30 mins?[/quote]

Nope NADA!

Be warned, I doubt the technique works if you’re stingy and only use 2-4oz of hops though… :lol:

Also, I keep the lid on and stir every 5 minutes or so. I think the stirring is essential to keep the hops in suspension and not floating on wort.

I’m interested in this idea that mash pH affects wort fermentability. You think higher pH favors the alpha amylase? Or is it a matter that less than optimum pH simply slows down conversion, and you’re left with a less fermentable wort? Or is this a perception issue where lower pH favors a tartness that comes across as dry? Keeping in mind that the beer is a good pH unit lower than the wort.

I’m kind of doubting this as a legitimate way to control fermentability but it is interesting to consider.

There are many variables which control fermentability. No doubt higher pH favors alpha, there are plenty of citations. Probably the most blatant is Martin’s water knowledge page in Bru’n water (https://sites.google.com/site/brunwater … knowledge; right above 2.5). I have always gone toward the lower end and liking the results of the hops, but noticed a lack of body to my beers. I want to test this to see if pH will make a difference. Hopefully I can retain the hop magic. In the end, I think temp and pH work hand in hand to determine fermentability, it’s just that temp is easier to manipulate so pH gets overlooked.

There you go, the new thing I learned today. I may have to break out my pH meter on a regular basis.

I’m just gonna push the pH a bit higher (5.5) in my brewing calcs. Bru’n water works so good I’ve decided to forgo replacing my meter’s electrode and truthfully I am enjoying not having to calibrate, etc.

I do know I am going to get more harshness from the hops at this higher pH but how much, I don’t know. Also, I am bit intimidated since this will be my first use of chinook…

[quote=“zwiller”]I do know I am going to get more harshness from the hops at this higher pH but how much, I don’t know. Also, I am bit intimidated since this will be my first use of chinook…[/quote]You could ferment as usual, try the finished beer, and if it’s flabby add some phosphoric to drop the pH below 4.6. Chinook is a great hop - drink an Arrogant Bastard if you haven’t had one in a while.

Haven’t had AB in ages but never had it fresh/on tap. I remember it being very course. Hoping to get a bit of the described chinook character without it dominating the cent/cascade.

The acid is a good idea, but I will still acidify sparge, so it shouldn’t end up flabby. I think I’ve just been overdoing it a bit.

[quote=“zwiller”]The acid is a good idea, but I will still acidify sparge, so it shouldn’t end up flabby. I think I’ve just been overdoing it a bit.[/quote]Misunderstood you, thought you were going to keep the higher pH into the finished beer (you mentioned “brightness” which I took to mean a lower pH in the glass).

No, you got me. I think I’ve been too low and will raise but hopefully will not enter flabby territory. Back when I measured KO pH I was shooting for 5.0-5.2 and will now aim for 5.2-5.4. Maybe I’m off but I think 5.7+ is flabby? IE sparging with high bicarb water.

[quote=“zwiller”]Back when I measured KO pH I was shooting for 5.0-5.2 and will now aim for 5.2-5.4. Maybe I’m off but I think 5.7+ is flabby? IE sparging with high bicarb water.[/quote]As long as your finished beer is in the 4.3 - 4.6 pH range you’ll be fine - not sure what pH makes for flabby beer, but I do know that there were a couple of beers back in my early brewing days (pre-pH awareness) that were likely on the higher side based on the grain bill and they were soapy and muted. I now shoot for 5.2 into the fermenter, but I’ve ended up at 5.3 and still had a finished pH in the proper range. So what you’re trying to do is perfectly reasonable.

Just doughed in. Went with mash pH of 5.5. Acidifying sparge to same. Based on my experience of loading the boil with gypsum KO should drop .2 or so to 5.3. That’s .2 units higher than what I normally shoot for.

Maybe it goes without saying but my previous beers were good, actually great, but had a bit too much brightness I think for an IPA. Perfect for a crisp lager prolly. Come to think about it, I think I got a little carried away from all the research that I used to this point was from Kai’s and other german lager stuff. :lol: I only recently stumbled upon Martin’s pH info. After I saw that, I had to try this.

Since your not adding any 60 min hops could you cut down the boil time? When using this method.

That’s a great idea since my brew time is so precious. Something to research. I cannot imagine any problem with it. That said I have Promash really dialed in for 60 minutes. 20% evap rate. Maybe I can just half it? 30 minute boil with 10% evap. Cool idea… Thanks

The yeast is pitched. Lost a little efficiency (3-4 points) but that was expected. Lower pH helps efficiency and since I am a little higher I lose that. Was kinda surprised how long I fought boilover foam on this brew. Hoping that is a good sign I got some new dextrins in there.

As usual, the smell of the wort is unbelievably hoppy. For the record, I changed recipe to the same as my previous brew (90% pale, 5% 10l crystal, 5% sugar) with only changing the crystal to 60l on this one. Hopefully, that allows me to see the impact of pH change.

Curious what you do to filter/avoid all those hops after cooling and transferring into the fermenter.

Nothing! It all goes in the fermenter. Years ago I used a fine mesh strainer and removed it. What a waste and pita. Then I read about guys having no issues leaving it in and I tried it and was hooked. For IPA’s I bump the volume up to 6G to cover such losses. I do however remove hop gunk and break on all lagers though by racking next day before pitching yeast.

Krausen has fallen and beer is basically done so I decided to steal a very yeasty sample to celebrate my 20 year anniversary with missus. Beer seems spot on. Less acidic bite, a touch less dry, and hop mojo is still there… I dig it.

Will give it another week or so and will dry hop. Hope to brew a hefe next Thursday with same higher pH target.

We’re on our way to Cleveland to check out some good beer and food (converted the missus to beer snob some time ago). :cheers:

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