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High Floccing WLP300?

So in a recent struggle to get my Weizenbock carbed I was shocked to see how flocculant my yeast was. This being a Heffe yeast I thought I was going to have lots of cloudy beer but even after a week in the bottle it appeared most of the yeast had dropped out of suspension. A gentle shake also doesnt really rouse the small “cake” at the bottom of the bottle. It’s basically acting like Notty. I think would explain the slow carbonation (just under 4 weeks and severely undercarbed). I added 5.2oz of dextrose so I know I added enough priming sugar.

Anyone ever notice a traditionally low floccing yeast clumping up like a scared turtle at the bottom of the bottle? I keep a plastic water bottle to keep an eye on carbing and i really have to shake the bejeezus out of that bottle just to get the yeast back into suspension.

No one has noticed a lower floccing yeast act like a high floccing yeast?

My last hefeweizen and witbier both turned out clear as a bell. And then there’s other styles that are supposed to clear that never do. It’s madness to expect a living creature like yeast to behave the way you want it to. It does what it wants. And although protein haze isn’t alive, it too seems to be <100% predictable.

Dave I agree. I made a 50% wheat 50% malt PA. Clearest damn beer yet! Without any finings/filtering it is commercially clear.

In the recent brewing with wheat beer the author says that the best % for a cloudy beer is 15-20% wheat. Over 40% and it will not want to stay cloudy.

In the recent brewing with wheat beer the author says that the best % for a cloudy beer is 15-20% wheat. Over 40% and it will not want to stay cloudy.[/quote]
Interesting. Did he say why? Especially since traditional hefes are 60% wheat yet cloudy. I do know commercially they often put in an additive to remain hazy.

http://www.wyeastlab.com/com_b_productd ... oductID=12

[quote=“Loopie Beer”][quote=“Rookie L A”]
In the recent brewing with wheat beer the author says that the best % for a cloudy beer is 15-20% wheat. Over 40% and it will not want to stay cloudy.[/quote]

Interesting. Did he say why? Especially since traditional hefes are 60% wheat yet cloudy. I do know commercially they often put in an additive to remain hazy.

http://www.wyeastlab.com/com_b_productd ... oductID=12[/quote]

I’m not sure, off hand, but I think it may have to do with the larger amount of wheat giving off more proteins that clump together more and drop out quicker.

Rookie, that was what my hypothesis would be. Funny thing about beer… the ones you want hazy drop clear and the others stay hazy…

If you wait long enough, most beers will drop clear.

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