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Haze Beer

Hello all. Let me tell you all what I’m trying to do. Although it seems that most home brewers are trying to get the cloudy haze out of their brews, I want to do the exact opposite. I really like cloudy beers, I think they look awesome. Last summer, I was on vacation in Ocean City, Maryland and had lunch at a BBQ place there, think it was called Station 7 or something like that. I ordered a wheat beer and it was absolutely gorgeous. Bright golden color with such a cloudy haze that I could not see my hand on the other side of the pint glass, alas I can’t not for the life of me remember what it was called. :?:
So I want to make something similar. I want to make a honey-wheat beer and I threw together a recipe with cloudiness being my number one goal. Let me know what you think, if I should change anything, or if I’m just damn crazy.

5 lbs white wheat
1.5 lbs Pale 6-row
1 lbs torrified wheat
1 lbs flaked wheat
1 lbs torrified barley
0.5 lbs Honey Malt
1 lbs Rice Hulls

1 oz Hallertau 60 min
0.5 oz Hallertau 5 min
0.5 Tettnang 5 min

1 oz Lemon peel 15 min

Yeast - White Labs WLP320 American Hefeweizen Ale

Dry hop w/ 2 oz Amarillo
(all hop additions will be pellets)

Also plan on using orange blossom honey as my priming sugar.

My idea is, wheat = cloudy so lots of wheat, protein = cloudy, use malts high in protein, low flocculation = cloudy, use yeast with that characteristic, pectin from boil fruit adds cloudiness, citrus peel has highest amount of pectin, hence lemon peel, plus I think it will taste great!.

Any other ideas on how to add to the haze please let me know!

Also considered putting pure pectin right in, since you can buy it as the grocery store because it is used to gel up jam. But I have no idea how much to use, and I wouldn’t want to make a think jelly beer, yuck!

Here’s an excerpt from my upcoming book that you might find interesting…

“Yet we should question our traditional wisdom. It turns out that wheat doesn’t have significantly higher protein levels compared to barley, but due to solubility factors it leeches more protein into the wort. According to a recent study from Leuven, Belgium, wheat can provide some improved foam stability, but only for brews with highly modified malts, only at a relatively high gravity, and only when gassed with Nitrogen instead of CO2. Even better, wheat is supposed to create cloudy beers, right? Well it turns out that the effect of wheat protein haze is more pronounced at lower overall levels of wheat in the mash. In other words, a beer brewed with 20% wheat will be hazier than a beer brewed with 40% wheat. According to the researchers this is believed to be due to the more aggressive breakdown of the large protein strands in the 20% wheat beer. This leads to smaller particles that are less likely to settle out.”

[quote=“Denny”]Here’s an excerpt from my upcoming book that you might find interesting…

“Yet we should question our traditional wisdom. It turns out that wheat doesn’t have significantly higher protein levels compared to barley, but due to solubility factors it leeches more protein into the wort. According to a recent study from Leuven, Belgium, wheat can provide some improved foam stability, but only for brews with highly modified malts, only at a relatively high gravity, and only when gassed with Nitrogen instead of CO2. Even better, wheat is supposed to create cloudy beers, right? Well it turns out that the effect of wheat protein haze is more pronounced at lower overall levels of wheat in the mash. In other words, a beer brewed with 20% wheat will be hazier than a beer brewed with 40% wheat. According to the researchers this is believed to be due to the more aggressive breakdown of the large protein strands in the 20% wheat beer. This leads to smaller particles that are less likely to settle out.”[/quote]

That is very interesting Denny. But I am somewhat skeptical. From my own experience, I can tell you that a wheat pale ale I brewed with 35% wheat had almost no haze and a white ipa, 60%, I brewed in almost the exact same way except with a higher % of white wheat to 2-row was much more cloudy.
Either way, I have heard of a couple people adding a Tbsp of wheat flour to the end of their boil to retained haziness, I’m thinking of trying that. i don’t think a table spoon in a 5 gallon batch should impart too much flavor.

P.S. What is your book going to be titled? I will be very interested to read it!

[quote=“vicwg12”]That is very interesting Denny. But I am somewhat skeptical. From my own experience, I can tell you that a wheat pale ale I brewed with 35% wheat had almost no haze and a white ipa, 60%, I brewed in almost the exact same way except with a higher % of white wheat to 2-row was much more cloudy.
Either way, I have heard of a couple people adding a Tbsp of wheat flour to the end of their boil to retained haziness, I’m thinking of trying that. i don’t think a table spoon in a 5 gallon batch should impart too much flavor.

P.S. What is your book going to be titled? I will be very interested to read it![/quote]

I’ve tried adding flour to the boil to increase haze. It eventually clears. I was skeptical, too, but the research appears to be solid.

The book will be out in Nov.


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