Growing Hops in the South

Does anyone live near or in Charlotte, NC? I live in Clover, SC and want to plant hops this year. I know Cascades grow good in this area, but has anyone had any luck with different kinds?

if cascades do well, im sure other american C varieties would do well too. Chinook, centennial, columbus

As said above. I have had good luck with chinook and cascade but my willimette struggled last year.

Barry

BTW Red clay heavy area.

What do you want to grow?

If I can grow Kent Goldings in Florida, I’d bet they do pretty well in S.C.

I’m not sure exactly what I want to grow. I would like to have a couple hops that I can use in a variety of brews. I’m not sure which hops those will be. I’m reading up on hops now to determine.

It appears that the lower the alpha acids the more versatile the hop will be. Is that right? I was thinking about a lower alpha acid hop and a higher alpha acid hop. My wife just found an organic website selling organic Nugget rhizome. Again, still learning exactly what this all means. By the time they grow this summer I will have a much better understanding.

Kent Goldings are a good all around low alpha hop (usually in the 3.0 to 5.0 range) used in many English Ales and other ale types. I grow them in Florida, and they do quite well.

cascades would be a good choice for a versatile variety. Even some higher AA hops are good as late additions, so don’t feel obligated to choose a low AA.

The problem with high AA hops, is you can’t know how many AA is in your crop. so bittering is difficult to predict… This is why it’s recommended to use your homegrown hops as late additions rather than the bittering addition. You’d be better off using a known AA hop (purchased from a farm/homebrew store/or the internet) for bittering for more control over your brew. Lower AA hops will contribute less to the bitterness when you add them late in the boil, also offering more control…

it’s all up to you. personally i like bitterness, so i don’t mind using my homegrown high AA hops (I usually use my homegrown hops for IPA’s). I still use purchased varieties for bittering additions. Whatever my late addition hops contribute to bitternes, is a crap-shoot: Thus i make IPA’s with my homegrown crop

My Cascades here in South Florida are going absolutely bonkers. Leaves poked out of the ground three weeks ago, and now they’re approaching 4 feet tall and climbing steadily up my trellis. Florida soil is this powdery ugly sand when dry, and it’s a bastard to keep moist or absorb any water at all. I dug a hole about a foot and a half deep by two feet wide, mixed half the native soil with half miracle grow potting soil, stuck the rhizomes in, and they’re growing like mad. I also toss my used brewing grains and boiled hop waste around the base of the bines and mix it in. Makes great fertilizer, and keeps the ground a little protected from scorching dry in the blazing Florida sun.

I ended up going with cascade and nugget hops. I wanted to do some Kent Goldings, maybe I’ll plant those next year.

I dug the holes about 1.5ft - 2ft deep. Put organic miracle grow garden soil and organic cow manure compost mixture. Planted them about 2" deep with the shoots upward into the mounds.

Only thing I’m curious about is the watering. I read to water them, let the soil dry out, then water again. If following this logic, I should be watering them every other day. I use a spray bottle so I don’t saturate the ground too much.

Thoughts?

I am not sure that a spray bottle watering is enough water for newly planted hops. They need a lot first year

[quote=“lmarkis”]I ended up going with cascade and nugget hops. I wanted to do some Kent Goldings, maybe I’ll plant those next year.

I dug the holes about 1.5ft - 2ft deep. Put organic miracle grow garden soil and organic cow manure compost mixture. Planted them about 2" deep with the shoots upward into the mounds.

Only thing I’m curious about is the watering. I read to water them, let the soil dry out, then water again. If following this logic, I should be watering them every other day. I use a spray bottle so I don’t saturate the ground too much.

Thoughts?[/quote]

I just trickle water mine with a hose right at the base of the bines for about 2 hours every other day, they seem to be loving it so far. The Cascades do seem to be growing a bit faster than the Kent Goldings, but they both look quite happy thus far.