Back to Shopping at NorthernBrewer.com

Getting ready for first AG - one question

Other than a brew in a bag, this will be my first all grain using an igloo 10 gallon mash tun.
Directions call for mash at 150° F for 60 minutes, then
Mashout: 168° F for 10 minutes.

I assume I need to add hot water to the mash to bring up the temp for mash out, Assuming about 10 lbs of grain, any rule of thumb to figure how much and how hot of water to add to bring up to mash-out temp?

I have a mash water calculator on my web site in the beer section that can help with this or you could just visit Denny’s excellent site
http://hbd.org/cascade/dennybrew/
for simple to follow instructions.

John

You only need to do a mashout if you’re fly-sparging (just in case you’re batch-sparging).

That said, based on information from other threads, a mashout (even with batch sparging) may raise your efficiency by 1-2 degrees Plato.

In lieu of a formal mash-out, if you heat your sparge water to 185+ or so, you should accomplish the same results. At least that’s what I remember from someone else’s post several months ago.

cheers.

[quote=“harpdog”]Other than a brew in a bag, this will be my first all grain using an igloo 10 gallon mash tun.
Directions call for mash at 150° F for 60 minutes, then
Mashout: 168° F for 10 minutes.

I assume I need to add hot water to the mash to bring up the temp for mash out, Assuming about 10 lbs of grain, any rule of thumb to figure how much and how hot of water to add to bring up to mash-out temp?[/quote]

skip it, to get it up that high without adding a ton of water to keep your batch sparge ratios the same you have to add boiling water about 1g and then still may not even hit it.

I think that this is unnecessary for batch sparging so I don’t do it and for many beers I wouldn’t have the room with my cooler set up. That said, could you pull your first runnings, heat those up and add them back in if you wanted to? That way your ratios would still be the same. Any down sides to this?

With a sparge you are rinsing the sugars from the grains. So adding them back to the tun defeats the purpose.

OK, if I get this right, I can pretty much do a batch sparge and not worry about a higher temp for mash out? I really am NOT concerned about effieciency at this point, I just want to taste a nice beer when it’s ready!
Maybe I’ll get fussy later.

Yep, pretty much mash, sparge and be done with it… you just want to be near your mash temps for at least 30 or so minutes and the rest is splitting frog hairs or alchemy. Just figure your water volumes and git-er-done.

John

[quote=“harpdog”]OK, if I get this right, I can pretty much do a batch sparge and not worry about a higher temp for mash out? I really am NOT concerned about effieciency at this point, I just want to taste a nice beer when it’s ready!
Maybe I’ll get fussy later.[/quote]

A fussy method for later:
You could try a step mash. Mash thicker, ~1 qt/lb, at 150F for ~45-50 minutes, and then add the necessary amount/temperature of water to mash at 168F for 10 minutes. I’ve run some numbers, and I think it’s about ~2 - 2.5 qt/lb mash thickness, all said & done. Then runoff & sparge.

You can also stick to a single infusion mash, as you’ve described. No harm done, and great beer.

Thanks!

That said, based on information from other threads, a mashout (even with batch sparging) may raise your efficiency by 1-2 degrees Plato.[/quote]

Or it may not.

That said, based on information from other threads, a mashout (even with batch sparging) may raise your efficiency by 1-2 degrees Plato.[/quote]

Or it may not.[/quote]

+1 I have never had a mashout raise my efficiency
and to only get 1-2 degree plato that wouldnt even be worth the hassle

Back to Shopping at NorthernBrewer.com