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Gelatin fining, THEN dry hop?

I dry hop, then use gelatin.

If you’re worried about the gelatin stripping away hop aroma, add more hops in the beginning.

Precisely.
I do the cold-crash and gelatin in a carboy (chilling the beer to just above freezing, then adding gelatin).

In a few days (or more typically, a week…I’m generally not in a hurry) it gets racked off of the settled gelatin/gunk, and into the keg for aging. At least 6-8 months for IPA (I’m an utterly hopeless traditionalist). About a month before I intend to start consuming the brew or bottling from the keg (as I sometimes do), I add the dry hops.

As I mentioned further up the thread some months ago, the result of this procedure has always been a clear and bright brew.

Precisely.
I do the cold-crash and gelatin in a carboy (chilling the beer to just above freezing, then adding gelatin).

In a few days (or more typically, a week…I’m generally not in a hurry) it gets racked off of the settled gelatin/gunk, and into the keg for aging. At least 6-8 months for IPA (I’m an utterly hopeless traditionalist). About a month before I intend to start consuming the brew or bottling from the keg (as I sometimes do), I add the dry hops.

As I mentioned further up the thread some months ago, the result of this procedure has always been a clear and bright brew.[/quote]

Perfect, thank you.

I suppose I need to wait until gravity is near my expected FG to cold crash? Does cold crashing harm yeast or just make them inactive?

Also, would fining have any effect on bottling carbonation since yeast is being stripped?

I really can’t comment on that with any real certainty, since my beer goes into the bottle already carbonated. I’m guessing that there might still be a minute amount of yeast in the beer even after fining, but I honestly don’t know if it would be enough for bottle conditioning (though if there is it will probably take considerably longer).

Others here will certainly weigh in with a more authoritative answer than I can provide. It has been probably 30 years since I’ve bottle conditioned any beer, and have never done so after cold crashing and fining.

Thanks.

I may just add some champagne yeast to the bottling bucket just in case.

[quote=“Gitster”]Thanks.

I may just add some champagne yeast to the bottling bucket just in case.[/quote]

But of course, I will heed caution so as not to make bottle bombs. Maybe Ill do a test in flip top growler with some priming sugar after I rack it, the week it takes to dry hop should give an indication of carbonation.

[quote=“The Professor”]At least 6-8 months for IPA (I’m an utterly hopeless traditionalist). About a month before I intend to start consuming the brew or bottling from the keg (as I sometimes do), I add the dry hops.
[/quote]

Wait, wait, wait, wait.

Does anyone else see this as bizarre? 6-8 MONTHS of cold-conditioning for an IPA? My understanding was the conventional wisdom was to drink these young and fresh???

Precisely.
I do the cold-crash and gelatin in a carboy (chilling the beer to just above freezing, then adding gelatin).

In a few days (or more typically, a week…I’m generally not in a hurry) it gets racked off of the settled gelatin/gunk, and into the keg for aging. At least 6-8 months for IPA (I’m an utterly hopeless traditionalist). About a month before I intend to start consuming the brew or bottling from the keg (as I sometimes do), I add the dry hops.

As I mentioned further up the thread some months ago, the result of this procedure has always been a clear and bright brew.[/quote]

Since you can see the gelatin, how does it look when settled? Is it tight and under and inch in the bottom of the carboy? Or more fluffy? I’ve only ever used it in kegs and so I don’t get to see it in action.

It looks just like trub. It gathers up all the nasties and settles to the bottom, so it looks identical. Not so much what you picture gelatine as looking like I suppose.

As per the Heady Topper clone recipe in this months BYO, “after final gravity has been achieved, add a clarifying agent such as Polyclar. Allow 3 days for agent to work then add first set of dry hops to primary fermenter. After 7 days, rack the beer off the dry hops and yeast cake either into a keg or secondary fermenter. After 5 days, prime and bottle or keg”.

A) We are GOING TO NEED THAT RECIPE.

B) Does dry hopping need to occur around fermenting temps? Is cold crashing temp too cold for the hop oils to permeate the beer? I would think so.

From The Oxford Companion, IIRC, dry-hopping is far more effective at 65-70*

From The Oxford Companion, IIRC, dry-hopping is far more effective at 65-70*[/quote]

I would just like to report that I have a fully carbed bottled beer (after three weeks) which I cold crashed with gelatin for a few days. I have ZERO sediment in my bottles.

[quote=“Pietro”][quote=“The Professor”]At least 6-8 months for IPA (I’m an utterly hopeless traditionalist). About a month before I intend to start consuming the brew or bottling from the keg (as I sometimes do), I add the dry hops.
[/quote]

[color=#FF0000]Wait, wait, wait, wait.
Does anyone else see this as bizarre? 6-8 MONTHS of cold-conditioning for an IPA? My understanding was the conventional wisdom was to drink these young and fresh???[/color][/quote]

It’s not bizarre at all, and tradition and history will attest to that. Besides, the “conventional wisdom” of IPA being best consumed young is a comparatively modern conceit.

The current fad of drinking IPA young is fine, and there’s a handful of good ones out there that can indeed be enjoyed that way. But as I pointed out in my post I am hopelessly bound to tradition…IPA was traditionally a beer that always had some extended bulk aging. In fact, my benchmark commercial IPA (my standard tipple in the late 1960s and 70’s) was cellar aged for a full year before bottling. That product was compelling proof that “fresh” beer can be vastly over rated, as well as the fact that time is definitely not always beer’s enemy.

And for whatever it’s worth, this was a 7.5 ABV, 70 IBU brew that had an almost explosive hop aroma (which I’ve yet to experience in any current day commercial brew!).
It definitely made a compelling case for “fresh beer” being an over-rated concept in some special instances…and it totally debunks the idea that an ale can’t exhibit significant hop bitterness and character after long aging.

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