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Frustrating stuck fermentation

My 1st BIAB attempt with the NB Kolsch recipe (incl using Wyeast 2565) has resulted in a stuck fermentation that won’t get unstuck. I started the fermentation in my basement at 60 degrees temp, got some fermentation action, but after 2 weeks, OG = 1.024. Moved the fermenter upstairs to 70 degree closet and swirled beer a couple times to suspend yeast. No movement on OG, moved beer back basement for 60 degree temps, still no action (now, it’s been 6 weeks since brewing). Pitched another smack pack of 2565 last week (OG = 1.024), kept fermenter in basement, still no active signs of fermentation. As of today, have moved fermenter back to 70 degree closet.

Did I oxygenate adequately? I think so, used the same technique as I have successfully done in the past.

My mashing technique had a lower temp (148-149 degrees) than preferred…did I create unfermentable sugars that I cannot get rid of? Do I adjust for this by reducing my priming sugars when I bottle?

At this point, that would be my strategy. What would be yours?

Thanks!

What was your starting gravity before you pitched the yeast?

starting gravity = 1.060

I’m suprised considering you mashed low at 148-149…that should give you highly fermentable wort…Are your thermometers calibrated? Anyway im thinking you got some unconverted starches in the beer…is it cloudy and turbid looking? What technique did you use to oxygenate? did you use pure o2,shake,air pump? i think possibly the temp swings stressed the yeast out and they quit on ya…I would just give it a while longer at 70*F and see what happens if no improvment bottle that sucker and get geared up for another brew…sorry i was not of great help…good luck with that brew

Sounds like you are using a refractometer to test your SG?

[quote=“mattbrew83”]I’m suprised considering you mashed low at 148-149…that should give you highly fermentable wort…Are your thermometers calibrated?
I haven’t had an issue with temperature calibration with my thermometers, but you ask a good question

Anyway im thinking you got some unconverted starches in the beer…is it cloudy and turbid looking?
Not really, the beer seems to be clearing nicely before I swirl it

What technique did you use to oxygenate? did you use pure o2,shake,air pump?
I used a siphon tap to splash the wort through a strainer before it goes into the carboy…this technique has worked well for me in the past

i think possibly the temp swings stressed the yeast out and they quit on ya…I would just give it a while longer at 70*F and see what happens if no improvment bottle that sucker and get geared up for another brew…sorry i was not of great help…good luck with that brew[/quote]
I’ll giver it one more week, then bottle it and chalk this up as a ‘lesson learned’

Thanks for your help!

Nope, just a standard hydrometer…no issues with it since I’ve had it (15+ years now :!: )

Nope, just a standard hydrometer…no issues with it since I’ve had it (15+ years now :!: )[/quote]

Congratulation on having the same hydrometer for 15 years!!!

The numbers you posted correlate well with numbers people post when using a refractometer. A refractometer needs to have a correction factor when reading a liquid with alcohol present. It will read a mid 20’s SG. But after correcting for the alcohol it is actually in the mid teens.

Double check your hyrdometer in RO/DI water to make sure it is reading accurately.

Was the yeast a new pack or reused? I had a beer go from 1.050 to 1.030 on some old yeast that seemed to ferment a starter fine. But it tasted terrible in the beer.

A new pack…smacked the pack the night before my brew day and pitched it about 18 hours after being smacked.

Several people I’ve talked with have scratched their heads about this problem. I’ve heard enough feedback to realize that I should just bottle it (being mindful of the relatively high FG) and move on. Live is too short to figure out every little “mishap”…there’s beer to be brewed and drunk! :cheers:

Thanks!

[quote=“theo.femur”]A new pack…smacked the pack the night before my brew day and pitched it about 18 hours after being smacked.

Several people I’ve talked with have scratched their heads about this problem. I’ve heard enough feedback to realize that I should just bottle it (being mindful of the relatively high FG) and move on. Live is too short to figure out every little “mishap”…there’s beer to be brewed and drunk! :cheers:

Thanks![/quote]
You did not make a starter? I think thats what cause the problem brother…stressed yeast are prone to quit…lesson learned ALWAYS make a starter bro…please do it for the yeast man…they will reward you i promise

[quote=“theo.femur”]A new pack…smacked the pack the night before my brew day and pitched it about 18 hours after being smacked.

[/quote]
Do you know how old the yeast was before smacking? I don’t mean how long you had it, but how long was it in the store / whatever before you had it… in other words, what was the expiration date of the yeast?
I haven’t had much trouble with only pitching a smack or vial or whatever in most of my brews - I don’t think that;s the only issue.
If it was older, there would have been less viable yeast before smacking, COULD cause problems, but you said that you pitched new yeast. That should have picked up where the old left off.

Along with Jays’ thoughts, I have a friend that routinely uses one smack pack in 10 gallons. He has no complaints.

My thoughts are you could have a longer lag time as the yeast multiply to the level they want. Once they get there they should ferment just fine.

[quote=“Nighthawk”]Along with Jays’ thoughts, I have a friend that routinely uses one smack pack in 10 gallons. He has no complaints.

My thoughts are you could have a longer lag time as the yeast multiply to the level they want. Once they get there they should ferment just fine.[/quote]

one smack pack in 10g is SEVERLY underpitching.
Pitching one smack pack in a 1.060 wort in 5g is underpitching also

[quote=“grainbelt”][quote=“Nighthawk”]Along with Jays’ thoughts, I have a friend that routinely uses one smack pack in 10 gallons. He has no complaints.

My thoughts are you could have a longer lag time as the yeast multiply to the level they want. Once they get there they should ferment just fine.[/quote]

one smack pack in 10g is SEVERLY underpitching.
Pitching one smack pack in a 1.060 wort in 5g is underpitching also[/quote]

“Technically” speaking, yes it is. But real world experience by someone I personally know, who is much smarter than me (easy task there!) tells me it works just fine, for him.

Like autolysis and transferring to a “secondary”, this may be an item that doesn’t necessarily translate from commercial brewing to home brewing.

Thousands of gallons of very good beer has been made by homebrewers that underpitched their yeast.

The individual brewer needs to find what works for them. I make a 3/4 gallon starter. That is over pitching for many 5 gallon beers. But seems to work for me.

[quote=“Nighthawk”][quote=“grainbelt”][quote=“Nighthawk”]Along with Jays’ thoughts, I have a friend that routinely uses one smack pack in 10 gallons. He has no complaints.

My thoughts are you could have a longer lag time as the yeast multiply to the level they want. Once they get there they should ferment just fine.[/quote]

one smack pack in 10g is SEVERLY underpitching.
Pitching one smack pack in a 1.060 wort in 5g is underpitching also[/quote]

“Technically” speaking, yes it is. But real world experience by someone I personally know, who is much smarter than me (easy task there!) tells me it works just fine, for him.

Like autolysis and transferring to a “secondary”, this may be an item that doesn’t necessarily translate from commercial brewing to home brewing.

Thousands of gallons of very good beer has been made by homebrewers that underpitched their yeast.

The individual brewer needs to find what works for them. I make a 3/4 gallon starter. That is over pitching for many 5 gallon beers. But seems to work for me.[/quote]

Sorry not buying it. If your barely under pitching and controlling everything else perfectly maybe. But pitching one pack even into a mOdest 10g batch is not good. If it wasn’t important no one would waste there time with it

[quote=“grainbelt”]

Sorry not buying it. If your barely under pitching and controlling everything else perfectly maybe. But pitching one pack even into a mOdest 10g batch is not good. If it wasn’t important no one would waste there time with it[/quote]

Just like folks are no chilling. Pitching yeast days/weeks later and turning out fabulous beers.

To each his/her own.

[quote=“Nighthawk”][quote=“grainbelt”]

Sorry not buying it. If your barely under pitching and controlling everything else perfectly maybe. But pitching one pack even into a mOdest 10g batch is not good. If it wasn’t important no one would waste there time with it[/quote]

Just like folks are no chilling. Pitching yeast days/weeks later and turning out fabulous beers.

To each his/her own.[/quote]

Ha sorry. Your going on with a wide spectrum of things. If you want to do it go ahead. Write a book about the scientific data that you have just disproven.

I guess You never let wort sit out for a wort stability test before?

[quote=“grainbelt”]

Ha sorry. Your going on with a wide spectrum of things. If you want to do it go ahead. Write a book about the scientific data that you have just disproven.

I guess You never let wort sit out for a wort stability test before?[/quote]

Contact Onthekeg for his “no chill” real world experience.

Remember, you can’t make beer with out thousands of dollars in stainless steel equipment. No good beer is made in plastic picnic coolers.

:blah:

[quote=“Nighthawk”][quote=“grainbelt”]

Ha sorry. Your going on with a wide spectrum of things. If you want to do it go ahead. Write a book about the scientific data that you have just disproven.

I guess You never let wort sit out for a wort stability test before?[/quote]

Contact Onthekeg for his “no chill” real world experience.

Remember, you can’t make beer with out thousands of dollars in stainless steel equipment. No good beer is made in plastic picnic coolers.

:blah: [/quote]

Wow your missing it all…

[quote=“grainbelt”]

Wow your missing it all…[/quote]

?

You will have to elaborate. Mind reading has never been my strong point.

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