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Forgot to aerate wort and shake carboy

So I was in a hurry on this last batch and I forgot to aerate the wort, I used a tube to siphon the wort into my carboy, I added the rehydrated yeast I prepared and then forgot to shake it all in.

I woke up this morning and I dont have any activity so I shook it up a little bit (not a crazy amount) because I forgot to shake it. This is a 5 gallon batch and my OG was 1.059, should I just let it be?

THANKS EVERYONE!

You could try adding a toothpick tip-sized drop of olive oil…

viewtopic.php?f=1&t=54757&start=180

YMMV.

The big issue (and reason New Belgium stopped doing it) is reduction of shelf life. All depends on how quickly you drink your creations :cheers:

Oxidation primarily after fermentation is complete or nearly complete. High OG beers sometimes get extra oxygen 12 to 18 hours after fermentation has become active to prevent high FGs.
Your yeast may be in the growth phase where they are using the available oxygen to propagate new cells. Go ahead and aerate if you can confirm fermentation has not begun.

Think about why you aerate…it’s to provide O2 that the yeast uses to synthesize sterols to keep cell walls flexible durng growth. When you pitch dy yeast, especially rehydrated, you pitch so many yeast cells that there is little to no need for cell growth. Unless the beer was very high grab=bvity, you’ll be fine doing nothing. I almost never bother to aerate when I use dry yeast.

BTW, I’ve discussed the use of OO in place of aeration with Grady Hull. He says it was never intended to be used that way, only during yeast storage. There is no evidence that OO is an effective sub for O2.

[quote=“Denny”]Think about why you aerate…it’s to provide O2 that the yeast uses to synthesize sterols to keep cell walls flexible durng growth. When you pitch dy yeast, especially rehydrated, you pitch so many yeast cells that there is little to no need for cell growth. Unless the beer was very high grab=bvity, you’ll be fine doing nothing. I almost never bother to aerate when I use dry yeast.

BTW, I’ve discussed the use of OO in place of aeration with Grady Hull. He says it was never intended to be used that way, only during yeast storage. There is no evidence that OO is an effective sub for O2.[/quote]

Awesome, thanks for the response, that makes me feel a lot better, this forum is so handy, thank you all so much for your help!

You may have adequate yeast cells to ferment your beer. Aeration is typically not required when you pitch dry yeast. The production process for dry yeast builds in reserves to make aeration unnecessary for average OG beers. During rehydration these reserves are used up. Rehydrated dry yeast becomes liquid yeast and is handled in the same manner as liquid yeast. Danstar recommends aeration for rehydrated dry yeast when the OG is above average.
What is average they do not say. To me it is about 1.052.

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