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Forgot to aerate--too late?

I pitched yeast into a 1065 IPA yesterday around 5pm, and just now (~14 hours later) remembered that I completely forgot to aerate/oxygenate my wort. There’s about 1" of krausen on the top at the moment, and the airlock is at a slow bubble. I did pour it out of the kettle (as opposed to siphoning) through a mesh strainer, but that’s about the extent of any aeration. I would usually have hooked it up to an oxygen tank and bubbled in some O2 for a minute.

Is it too late to oxygenate the wort? Will it be too late in another 8-10 hours (because I’m at work)?

/bonehead

Thanks.

As I understand it the yeast needs the O2 in the first several hours while they are multiplying, before they go into fermentation mode. I wouldn’t worry about it at this point. If you have a nice krausen in 14hrs you probably had enough O2 in there already.

Dry or liquid yeast?

From what I have read, dry doesn’t need oxygen.

did you create much foam when you transferred from the kettle ? if so, you should be fine.

[quote=“Belpaire”]Dry or liquid yeast?

From what I have read, dry doesn’t need oxygen.[/quote]

Correct, only need to aerate when using liquid yeast. Although it doesnt hurt either way.

Odd you should ask: there was a ton of foam, much more than I usually see. It was a washed 1056 yeast cake. I ended up not adding any additional O2/aeration, FWIW.

Late in response, but you did the right thing by not aerating. Even with shaking you’ll only achieve a max 8ppm O2 content, which can be achieved with the straining.

[quote=“Belpaire”]Dry or liquid yeast?

From what I have read, dry doesn’t need oxygen.[/quote]

Never heard that before. Why would dry yeast not require aeration?

See the following thread that has some follow up info on the topic of dry yeast & lack of need for O2. That myself and another member were just hashing over recently.

viewtopic.php?f=5&t=110232#p972177

foam doesnt have anything to do with aeration

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