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First recipe feedback/ question

3 gallon partial mash

3 Pound 2 row
1 Pound munich
0.75 pound crystal 80
1 pound dry light malt extract (boil 30)

.40 cluster hops (first wort)
.40 cluster hops (boil 40)
.20 cluster hops (boil 20)

Irish moss+ yeast nutrient (boil 10)

US 05 yeast- 1 packet

OG=1.046( wanted 1.052 but my efficiency was poor 55%)
37 IBUs
13 srm( nice orange/red)

To explain the ingredient list I oredered the stuff to do a pumpkin ale but after tasting many pumpkin beers while i waited for my stuff to come i realized that i hate pumpkin ales.

The wort smelled and tasted aweful however the smells coming out of the fermenter are delicious.

Just wondering is this something that differs between extract and using grains becuase there was not this big of a difference with my first batch that was Extract.

That looks decent enough to me. Nothing too crazy going on which is good for your first recipe.

Wants the point of using just one pound of extract? If you are going through all the trouble of mashing all the rest, just do all grain. What is another 1.5# of 2 row?

[quote=“beerme11”]3 gallon partial mash

3 Pound 2 row
1 Pound munich
0.75 pound crystal 80
1 pound dry light malt extract (boil 30)

.40 cluster hops (first wort)
.40 cluster hops (boil 40)
.20 cluster hops (boil 20)

Irish moss+ yeast nutrient (boil 10)

US 05 yeast- 1 packet

OG=1.046( wanted 1.052 but my efficiency was poor 55%)
37 IBUs
13 srm( nice orange/red)

To explain the ingredient list I oredered the stuff to do a pumpkin ale but after tasting many pumpkin beers while i waited for my stuff to come i realized that i hate pumpkin ales.

The wort smelled and tasted aweful however the smells coming out of the fermenter are delicious.

Just wondering is this something that differs between extract and using grains becuase there was not this big of a difference with my first batch that was Extract.[/quote]

I would also move the bittering hop addition to 60 bit. Not sure if you are trying to make an amber or an APA but either way they are under hop with your current format.

here is it as you have written.

beermetest1
American Amber Ale

Recipe Specs

Batch Size (G): 3.0
Total Grain (lb): 5.750
Total Hops (oz): 1.00
Original Gravity (OG): 1.059 (°P): 14.5
Final Gravity (FG): 1.015 (°P): 3.8
Alcohol by Volume (ABV): 5.80 %
Colour (SRM): 14.5 (EBC): 28.6
Bitterness (IBU): 23.5 (Average)
Brewhouse Efficiency (%): 75
Boil Time (Minutes): 75

Grain Bill

3.000 lb American 2-Row (52.17%)
1.000 lb Dry Malt Extract - Light (17.39%)
1.000 lb Munich I (17.39%)
0.750 lb Crystal 80 (13.04%)

Hop Bill

0.40 oz Cluster Pellet (5.7% Alpha) @ 20 Minutes (First Wort) (0.1 oz/Gal)
0.40 oz Cluster Pellet (5.7% Alpha) @ 40 Minutes (Boil) (0.1 oz/Gal)
0.20 oz Cluster Pellet (5.7% Alpha) @ 20 Minutes (Boil) (0.1 oz/Gal)

Misc Bill

Single step Infusion at 151°F for 60 Minutes.
Fermented at 65°F with

Recipe Generated with BrewMate
http://www.brewmate.net

but if you move the 40 addition to 60. it would be closer to a style.

beermetest1
American Amber Ale

Recipe Specs

Batch Size (G): 3.0
Total Grain (lb): 5.750
Total Hops (oz): 1.00
Original Gravity (OG): 1.059 (°P): 14.5
Final Gravity (FG): 1.015 (°P): 3.8
Alcohol by Volume (ABV): 5.80 %
Colour (SRM): 14.5 (EBC): 28.6
Bitterness (IBU): 26.2 (Average)
Brewhouse Efficiency (%): 75
Boil Time (Minutes): 75

Grain Bill

3.000 lb American 2-Row (52.17%)
1.000 lb Dry Malt Extract - Light (17.39%)
1.000 lb Munich I (17.39%)
0.750 lb Crystal 80 (13.04%)

Hop Bill

0.40 oz Cluster Pellet (5.7% Alpha) @ 20 Minutes (First Wort) (0.1 oz/Gal)
0.40 oz Cluster Pellet (5.7% Alpha) @ 60 Minutes (Boil) (0.1 oz/Gal)
0.20 oz Cluster Pellet (5.7% Alpha) @ 20 Minutes (Boil) (0.1 oz/Gal)

Misc Bill

Single step Infusion at 151°F for 60 Minutes.
Fermented at 65°F with

Recipe Generated with BrewMate
http://www.brewmate.net

Disregard. I see that you have already brewed it.

and I did my figures on 75% not the 55% you actually got.

Mashed on stove top in a bag. Most of the PM recipes i saw kept the grains below 5 pounds so i figured i’d keep to that. Also this was my first attempt at doing a mash so i figured the extract would give me a buffer if my efficiency was bad (which it was)

[quote=“muddywater_grant”]Disregard. I see that you have already brewed it.

and I did my figures on 75% not the 55% you actually got.[/quote]

Thanks for pluggin that in either way. I used beer smith. It was based around an American amber ale profile. I see your IBUs came out at 26 but it says boil 20 for first wort hops. Maybe i was worng about what first first wort hops are?

Mine sat for awhile in water from mash then boiled for 60, i put them in the pot as i was sparging and left them the whole boil time. With a 3 gallon boil my IBUs were at 37. I would been right in the center for everything, IBUS actually on the high end, if my efficiency would have been the 65% i predicted.

also the clusters i got were 6.8 alpha

Denny said he calculates his FWH as 20 addition. So that is what I use. And they seem to always be in the correct range when tasting the final product.

interesting info. The total opposite of what i thought. Do you know the reasoning for that?

interesting info. The total opposite of what i thought. Do you know the reasoning for that?[/quote]

Perceived bitterness versus actual ibu’s. you drink beer, you not look at it through a microscope.

As the boil kettle fills, the hops immediately begin releasing their oils into the wort. Because they are added below boiling temperature, where the coumpunds that provide aroma to your beer normally boil off, the oils are converted to more soluble compounds in the liquid, and do not boil off as readily during the boil. You should use some of the hops that you would normally use in the last 20 minutes of your boil.
Common wisdom says that the amount of bittering imparted to your beer is roughly equivalent to the same hops added for 20 minutes. However, there is still some debate over this fact on the online message boards.

interesting info. The total opposite of what i thought. Do you know the reasoning for that?[/quote]

Perceived bitterness versus actual ibu’s. you drink beer, you not look at it through a microscope.

As the boil kettle fills, the hops immediately begin releasing their oils into the wort. Because they are added below boiling temperature, where the coumpunds that provide aroma to your beer normally boil off, the oils are converted to more soluble compounds in the liquid, and do not boil off as readily during the boil. You should use some of the hops that you would normally use in the last 20 minutes of your boil.
Common wisdom says that the amount of bittering imparted to your beer is roughly equivalent to the same hops added for 20 minutes. However, there is still some debate over this fact on the online message boards.[/quote]

That makes sense. Next time ill move a portion of the finishing hops up to FWH like john palmer recommends and count it as a 20 minute addition. but for now Ill just hope my beer tastes good. thanks for the info.

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