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Figuring out how to do a Java Stout

I have decided to branch out and experiment with recipes and I want to make a Java Stout. I’m unsure how to get the Java flavor in there, should I use coffee beans as a specialty grain or add them to secondary? Also, do I have to worry about sanitizing them if I add them to the secondary. I suppose the question should be: what is the best way to add Java to a Stout?

Thank You,

Matt

Make a strong pot of coffee and add to the secondary. Or do a cold-press of the beans rather than brewing if you want to cut the bitterness.

I like to cold press the coffee for my coffee stouts. It will reduce the acid and the oils. Just make sure that you don’t skimp on quality and use a high quality bean.

For maximum aroma, dry bean the secondary. I use about 5 oz. of coarsely cracked beans. No need to sanitize them. For more flavor, I add freshly brewed espresso (your choice of brewing method) to taste.

I add both dry beans and coffee. I use 4 oz dry beans in secondary and then I use 6 cups of coffee in the bottling bucket. Great aroma and taste w/o over powering the brew.

I make 3 gallons of real strong coffee & use as top off w/ a partial boil.

I see, thank you for the tips. Adding coffee to the bottling bucket seems like an off-the-wall idea, I like it.

3 gallons :shock:

I’d either dry-bean or cold-press. A pot of strong coffee tastes great. But how does it taste tomorrow? How does it taste after a few weeks?

Actually, it’s a pretty standard way to add flavoring. It’s much more controllable than adding it to the kettle or fermenter since you can add to taste and don’t have to guess.

Actually, it’s a pretty standard way to add flavoring. It’s much more controllable than adding it to the kettle or fermenter since you can add to taste and don’t have to guess.[/quote]
I assume the same can be done if you’re kegging, yes?

Actually, it’s a pretty standard way to add flavoring. It’s much more controllable than adding it to the kettle or fermenter since you can add to taste and don’t have to guess.[/quote]
I assume the same can be done if you’re kegging, yes?[/quote]

You betcha! I like to pour 4 2oz. samples of the beer (before priming if you’re bottling). Dose each one with a different, measured amount of your flavoring. Taste to decide which you like best and scale that amount of flavoring up to your batch size.

[quote=“BrewingRover”]
3 gallons :shock: [/quote]
up all night with a good buzz. hahaha!!!

[quote=“Wahoo”]I’d either dry-bean or cold-press. A pot of strong coffee tastes great. But how does it taste tomorrow? How does it taste after a few weeks?[/quote]it tastes great after it’s done fermenting & carbed up nicely.

I do up the priming sugar, since the oils of the coffee beans tend to inhibit the ability to hold carbonation/head. I will say my coffee stout is beast at about 6 months of age.

[quote=“Edward Teach”][quote=“BrewingRover”]
3 gallons :shock: [/quote]
up all night with a good buzz. hahaha!!!

Have you ever tried either “dry beaning” or cold brewing your coffee?

I’ve only done one batch of espresso stout, but I added 1/2 gallon of strong coffee (used a french press with 3 oz of beans, two 32 oz batches) at bottling time. It was phenomenal, even 10 months later. The espresso character faded a bit with age, but it was still great.

I might have to try the “dry beaning” and a bottling addition with the next batch.

[quote=“Wahoo”]

Have you ever tried either “dry beaning” or cold brewing your coffee?[/quote]
not yet. but there’s a first for everything!

I’m going to use an oz. of dry beaning during the secondary then add some coffee to the bottling bucket with some extra priming sugar. I haven’t decided which hopes to use yet, I was learning towards 2 oz. of US Golding for 60 then add something else later on. It’s all experimental at this point, I have a good 30 gals. fermenting to fall back on if it goes bad :smiley:

Why are you using extra priming sugar?

Someone mentioned that the coffee beans offset the carbonation, so adding extra sugar will onset it. Maybe this is true, I’m always open for suggestions.

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