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Fermenting an ale like a lager

I am asking this question out of curiosity. I made an Oktoberfest lager. I fermented it at 50 degrees liquid temperature for 3 weeks. I then pulled the carboy out of the temperature controlled freezer and set it on the floor at room temperature for a D-rest for three days, after which I racked to the secondary then placed it in the freezer controlled at 35 degrees to start the lager process. Would there be an advantage to do this with an ale? After 3 weeks of fermenting an ale in the low 60’s, allow it to come to room temperature for a few days before kegging? Will the yeast become active again at a warmer temperature and continue to clean the beer? Has anyone done this process for their ales?
Brad

The procedure you are describing for the ale is a typical procedure for many homebrewers. Stable SG readings are still needed before kegging.

The procedure you are describing for the ale is a typical procedure for many homebrewers. Stable SG readings are still needed before kegging.[/quote]

Strongly agree with ya on the SG issue. I got away from the secondary and usually ferment for three weeks at 60 -68 degree liquid temperature then start checking the SG. If no change the brew gets kegged. I haven’t let my ales climb to room temperature for a few days before kegging. I just started wondering if anybody did that for an ale. I have a porter fermenting now. Tuesday will be two weeks at 60 degrees. I think I’ll try this procedure and see what happens. Thanks :slight_smile:

Yes, after fermentation in the low 60’s, a couple days at a warmer temp. for a Diacetyl rest is a benefit for most ales as well as lagers.

After the Diacetyl rest I did for the lager, and racking to the secondary I sent the temperature down to @35 degrees in the chest freezer for it to lager. This porter I have fermenting is Dry Dock Urca Vanilla Porter. Directions say to place vanilla beans in the secondary and rack on top of them and let it in the secondary for two weeks. When I do this should I place the secondary back in the freezer and set the controller for 60 degrees liquid temperature or just keep it at room temperature for the two weeks? This part of the plan is new to me. I never added anything to a secondary before.

I would leave the secondary at room temperature, 72° or less. This temp should be optimum for the beer to absorb the vanilla flavor.

Thank you. Sounds like a plan to me. I’ll keep it in the room I brew in. At this time of the year it’s about 68 degrees in there. :cheers:

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