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Fermenter poll

Just want to get an idea of what people are using as fermenters.

I have glass, buckets, and better bottles. I have no issue using any of the three. In the past I was strongly on the side of buckets for the reasons that have been stated again and again. My thinking has recently moved more towards glass, but again, I have no issue using any of these options. I will generally grab the carboy first, then the better bottle and a bucket last. They all have pluses and minuses. But in the end, they will all ferment my beer properly and all need a specific type of care.

I use buckets 99% of the time. The other 1% I use a 10 gal. corny.

I’ve always fermented in buckets, both for beer and wine. It use to be that once primary fermentation was done, I’d secondary in glass carboys, but I’ve found that for beer that isn’t needed at all. And for wine I’m now using low gas porosity PET for secondaries. Have gotten away from glass entirely - for many reasons.

I use glass, plastic buckets, and just now getting into buckets.

Plastic buckets for primary on almost everything except for sours, which have their own dedicated BB.

Plastic carboys for dry hopping, bulk aging, etc.

Glass jugs for random 1-gallon batches of cider and whatnot.

I’ve used a bucket once when I got the starter kit. Ever since I’ve used glass. I only ever broke one and that was a default in the glass. Our host site replaced it no issues. They are heavy and take up space but I simply prefer them. That said, next time there’s a sale, I’ll be picking up some. I don’t have any more room to store carboys and buckets stack.

I bought a PET carboy after my first brew (bucket) cause I couldn’t stand not seeing what’s going on during fermentation. I have yet to have a need for multiple brews in primary (don’t brew that often) but if/when I do, I will probably get either another PET carboy or just go back to using my bucket.

There is a market opportunity for someone to make a clear bucket. Just don’t ferment in the presence of UV.

There is a market opportunity for someone to make a clear bucket. Just don’t ferment in the presence of UV.[/quote]

Cambro, about $40…

There is a market opportunity for someone to make a clear bucket. Just don’t ferment in the presence of UV.[/quote]

Cambro, about $40…

[/quote]

WOW! That brings me back to my restaurant days. Thanks for the flashback, Denny.

I use glass carboys for beer and 38 quart SS pots for the primary with cider, mead, and wine. Wanted to explain the “other”. We also use them to process tomatoes, etc. (they work as brew pots too).

There is a market opportunity for someone to make a clear bucket. Just don’t ferment in the presence of UV.[/quote]

Cambro, about $40…[/quote]
There is a market opportunity for someone to make a clear, inexpensive bucket. :slight_smile:

I ferment 4 gallons in 5 gallon cornies. Previously used carboys.

buckets for sure. to many up sides not to, cheap,easy to clean, easy access to contents and easier to harvest yeast.

I used to use only glass for many years and never had a problem since I had a walkout basement put in on a cart and roll it around.
My new house does not have the walkout so I have to carry it down the 13 steps. With a full glass carboy I slipped and almost lost it after that it’s been plastic buckets. But I do the secondary in 5 gallon glass.

I think maybe the situation is that cheap food-safe plastics aren’t clear, and clear food-safe plastics aren’t cheap. I did a fair bit of hunting at one point, and finally gave up.

10 gallon Cornelius kegs

I’ve used both glass carboys (in the past) and plastic buckets, and I can honestly say that I experienced no advantage with glass whatsoever, and plenty of drawbacks, especially with regard to cleaning. I’ve heard various rationale over the years as to why plastic buckets are supposedly inferior, but there’s no question that in my experience, there’s nothing wrong with them at all. Yes, you do need to replace them every so often because the plastic starts to absorb odors and gets stained from wort, but they last for a pretty darn long time, and they’re still very cheap to buy. I’m sure I’m preaching to the choir to those already in the same camp as me, but for anyone here who’s new to the hobby and is considering what equipment to purchase, I’ll take the opportunity to spread the “plastic bucket gospel”. Helping people avoid wasting money on expensive equipment they don’t need is definitely a worthy cause in my book.

Used to use a bucket; moving to the Big Mouth. (Not Martha Rae)

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