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Falling yeast

I have a question about yeast. I brewed a White House Honey Ale and it was in primary for a week. When I decided to transfer it I noticed the yeast really hadn’t fallen yet and the beer was cloudy. I went ahead and did the transfer but I was wondering how long it will take in secondary for the yeast to fall. My previous batch of WHHA didn’t seem to be cloudy like this.
The beer has been in secondary for a few hours and the top few inches seem to be darker now. Could this be a temperature issue? It is around 64 degrees.

Everything you’ve said sounds normal. It will take days if not weeks to clear. 64F sounds perfect for most ale yeasts, go to the yeast manufacter to see the recommended yeast temp range or just google it. 32-50F temps will accelerate the yeast to drop, do this only when you want the ale yeast to stop completly.

Why move from the primary after 1 week? You’re removing most of the yeast but there’s probably alot of fermerntation yet to go.

[quote=“Waszup”]

Why move from the primary after 1 week? You’re removing most of the yeast but there’s probably alot of fermerntation yet to go.[/quote]
+1. You transferred too soon. It obviously wasn’t done fermenting and luckily you transferred yeast in suspension so it should finish up. Get hydrometer and don’t transfer from your fermentation vessel until you get a constant gravity reading for a couple days in a row.

I only transferred because I usually only wait a week for all my batches and I saw no co2 activity. However I guess I was wrong. I should have waited longer.
Thanks for the responses. I will wait another couple weeks in secondary to see if it falls. I have learned my lesson lol.

for what it’s worth. your beer would have cleared in the primary too

In most circles unsolicited advice is outright rude, but around here you’re going to get sound advice that you weren’t looking for. So as defensive or offended as it might make you (it took me a while to learn this here) heed the wisdom of the homebrew gurus. These guys know what their talking about.

My two cents: your airlock (co2 activity) is never an indication of any kind that the beer is done. When you feel like the beer is finished only trust your gravity readings from your hydrometer. The samples take away ounces, but the sacrificed brew goes on to guarantee a higher quality product in the end. :cheers:

Best of luck man.

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