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Extract hefe

A few weeks ago I had a hefe at Gordon Biersch and loved it. Thinking about trying to brew something similar… I’m an all extract brewer, so I’m looking at NB’s bavarian hefeweizen extract kit. GB uses hallertau hops in their brew, while the NB kit comes with tettnang. The liquid yeast option for NB’s kit seems to be the same as what GB uses(weihenstephan 68).

So several questions…

Should I order some hallertau and sub them for the tettnang?

OG of the kit is under 1.050 so is one smack pack(no starter) enough? I’ve never used liquid yeast.

I really like the banana and clovey taste, so would anyone have ideas for a good ferment temp to accentuate these flavors from the weihenstephan 68 yeast?

Thanks for any help

Ron

I brewed this kit last year and somewhere I remember a mention that the best fermentation temperature is 68 degrees. Found it - NB’s hint is on the web page for the yeast. I got close to that and the beer came out great. That said, the temp range on the yeast is 64-75 degrees and you’ll make good beer. You definitely need the liquid yeast to get those flavors.

As far as substituting hops, there is only the one bittering addition for 60 minutes of boil, so I think it might be tough to detect a difference, especially with all of the other flavors this beer brings.

One smack pack should be OK. I think I’ve seen articles where you want to slightly underpitch to get a lot of the wheat beer yeast flavors.

This one is drinkable fresh and new, it tasted fantastic flat out of the fermenter. The taste changes a lot over time

I followed the process and recipe summaraized in the (edited) first post of “The Great Bavarian Weissbier Project of 2007/2008” viewtopic.php?f=5&t=40751&hilit=bavarian+weizen+project

The thread runs for 50 pages but is summarized in the edited first post.

I brewed a Bavarian Weizen/Weissbier a couple of months ago using WB-06 at 62 F, as recommended in the post and in “Brewing Classic Styles…” by Palmer and Zainasheff. Yes, that’s lower than the stated temperature range, but yeast can’t read and they did a great job. If you’re a fan of liquid yeast, I assume it should work at least as well, maybe better. It had a good clove note and no banana (that I could detect). Your fermentation temperature will determine the phenols and esters produced.

The only problem I had was that it didn’t last long enough. Time to brew more.

Bavarian Hefe is one of my favorites. Last batch I deliberately over pitched the yeast. Held the WY3068 fermentation temperature to 62° to 64°. When fresh, light banana aroma to the nose, spicy clove body. Finish is dry and spicy with a hint of banana. As it ages more banana aroma in the body.

Thanks for the feedback, guys. Gonna give it my best shot.

Gonna brew this hefe tomorrow. Got to thinking, I’ve had some small carbonation issues lately (I bottle exclusively). I know the calculators call for over 3 volumes co2 and that scares me a bit. My last nut brown was really good but a good bit overcarbed. Final gravity was good(1.010), hydrometer checked out, priming sugar mixed well. I guess after getting overcarbed with a little over 1/2 cup of corn sugar in five gallons, I’m a little nervous about over a cup that this hefe calls for.

Any suggestions or tips will be appreciated. Hoping some of you have bottled this recipe and can give me some feedback. I tend to like my beer a little less carbonated than most.

Thanks,
Ron

I usually go for 3.6 volumes when I calculate the amount of priming sugar to use. I use corn sugar and weigh out the amount instead of using a volume measurement. I also use 4.5 gallons as the amount of beer going into the bottle. The one-half gallon under five is for spillage and the amount left in the carboy to avoid getting trub in the bottling bucket.

Lots of great advice on this thread!

I would never ever use more than 3/4 cup priming sugar for 5 gallons. You will get PLENTY of carbonation. If you use any more than that you will have gushers guaranteed.

I agree. Even the fermentation of a hefe is usually a gusher. Make sure you have plenty of head space (maybe use 2 carboys for a 5 gallon batch) and have a blow off hose, not just an air lock.

Thanks, guys. I’ve got the carboy in the swamp cooler now just waiting for some airlock activity. I always put a blowoff tube on before going to bed on the first night if I haven’t needed it sooner.

Sounds like I should just plan on about 5/8 to 3/4 cup corn sugar to prime. I feel much more comfortable with that than the 1 cup plus that the calculator calls for…

Ron

[quote=“Frenchie”]Thanks, guys. I’ve got the carboy in the swamp cooler now just waiting for some airlock activity. I always put a blowoff tube on before going to bed on the first night if I haven’t needed it sooner.

Sounds like I should just plan on about 5/8 to 3/4 cup corn sugar to prime. I feel much more comfortable with that than the 1 cup plus that the calculator calls for…

Ron[/quote]
Which calculator did you use that measures priming sugar by volume and not weight?

Ron[/quote]
Which calculator did you use that measures priming sugar by volume and not weight?[/quote]

The one on this site. It gives both volume and weight. Calls for about 1.05 cups in 5 gallons at 68*f.

I know I should get a digital scale.

Which calculator did you use that measures priming sugar by volume and not weight?[/quote]

The one on this site. It gives both volume and weight. Calls for about 1.05 cups in 5 gallons at 68*f.

I know I should get a digital scale.[/quote]
I looked around and found it. I use a different one. I don’t know how I would measure 0.76 cups. My eyes aren’t that good.

My old brain reminded me I forgot to mention something else about inconsistent carbonation. Bottling before FG has been reached will affect the amount of CO2 produced in bottle conditioning.

Well, this hefe is cooking right along. I brewed this past Sunday(oct. 13). As Flars suggested, I have kept the beer temp somewhere between 60 and 64. So today is the seventh day of fermentation. No blow off, but a beautiful krausen that started Monday and is still about an inch thick. Bubbling has been steady this whole time, never violent. Still getting about 5 or 6 good bubbles thru airlock per minute. Smells wonderful. Current beer temp is 65*f. My question:

Should I begin raising the temp a bit or just let it continue at current temps? I’ve never had a fermentation that was this active for this long. I’m looking for as much banana and as mild a clove taste as I can get.

My dilemma is that I need my swamp cooler (laundry sink) next weekend for another brew. And I don’t want to delay that brew because I need to make a yeast starter and my yeast in the fridge is (I assume) losing viability every day. Next beer OG is 1.079, so I need that starter to be happy. Maybe I should just buy a cheap plastic tub as a backup cooler? Any suggestions welcomed.

Thanks,
Ron

The fermentation will get really slow in the next day or two. You can take it out of the swamp cooler and let it sit at ambient room temperature. The flavor profile has been set. All it needs now is some time to clean up and drop a couple more gravity points.

That’s great news. Thanks, Flars. Judging by the smell, I’m really looking forward to the finished product. Thanks for all your help!

Ron

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