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Efficient/ easy method of pouring wort into primary?

I just have a small funnel and I lose some liquid due to the fact that my wort cooking pot is a very large one and thus has a wide brim, resulting in a wide stream of liquid coming out of it. Couple this with the fact that the wort pot is heavy, usually hot to handle (I pour early as my cooling methods seem too slow, I believe that pouring still-hot but relatively sterile wort into a sterilized container is superior to waiting too long and possibly spoiling my previously sterile wort) and that my funnel’s too small for me to keep a continuous stream of liquid into it easily at the weight/hotness of the wort container because the flow rate out of the funnel is very slow.

I’m really not too picky about losing some wort, but my current procedure is very awkward and definitely a workout, I was wondering if you guys siphon or something else, and if so under what conditions, do you actually cool down the wort?

And for those concerned, I do wait for the wort to cool in the primary before adding yeast

I use a 1/2 inch siphon

My brew pot is 18 gallon and pretty wide without a valve. I use a I gallon measuring cup and transfer the hot wort from brew kettle thru a double screen into my smaller brew pot with a valve. Then gravity feed thru my CFC into my fermenter.

Yep. May be the best $14 you’ve ever spent.

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I get the wort down to near pitching temperature in the kettle. I use an immersion chiller, and if I’m doing a partial volume boil then I’ll also pour in cold water to get up to final volume in order to help get the temperature down more quickly. Then let it sit in the kettle, covered, for an hour or so to let all the break material settle out. After that it’s the siphon, being careful to leave the sludge behind.

+1 on the siphon. Its got to be a lot safer. You’ll probably pull less trub than pouring, too.

Ya. I’ve gone back and forth a bit, and I’ve decided that pouring will be my go-to technique for when I absolutely have to ensure that my beer has plenty of chill haze and hopefully also a little of that nice stale hop twang.

For beers where I don’t need to get that, I take the easy way out and siphon. It does take a bit longer, but I just think of that as a nice time to daydream about how my next kettle will have a spigot.

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