Back to Shopping at NorthernBrewer.com

Effect of boiling down after removing hops?

I had some issues with water volumes for brewing the Winter Warmer (pdf)

. I reached the 60 minute mark, and after removing the hop spider (and ensure all liquids were drained out of the spider), I had about 6 gallons remaining, when I had been shooting for 5.25 to 5.5.

So, I turned the burner back on, and boiled for an additional 20 minutes, without the hops in the kettle. I know I should have done this on the front end; that said, what can I expect?

You and I will both learn something here. I brewed the Dry Dock Urca Vanilla porter a few weeks ago. I sparged too much due to an issue I don’t want to get into. I had to boil 2.5 hours to get rid of all that water and to get the OG to a reasonable range. I used enough propane that I could have gone for another brew session. Crap! Now I got to get the tanks filled over a stupid mistake of not watching what you are doing. Perfect excuse to buy that back up 35 pounder!
I guess I should add that I still only boiled the hops for 30 minutes.

All of your hop additions will be as if you had boiled for some greater amount near 20 minutes. Maybe figure 15 minutes. So a 15-minute addition now acts as if it were for 30 minutes, and any flameout additions as if it were 15, etc. Approximately. Since the hops weren’t in the boil for the last 20 minutes, you didn’t extract quite as much stuff out of them, but most of their goodness was already leached into the beer while they were in the boil. So the main effects of course will be, more bitterness and less flavor and aroma. Now that all is said and done, you might want to compensate for any flavor and aroma additions by some extra dry hopping. Or don’t, and treat this as an experiment. You’ll still make beer!

“Less flavor and aroma” in a malt-forward, scottish-ale-yeast-using “winter warmer” style?

I suppose what I’m asking about is what to expect, specifically, from a 10-minute addition of an ounce of willamette hops in a malty beer, so I know whether or how to adjust mine to taste.

I’m not afraid of deviating from the recipe with a little dry hopping, but I don’t usually use Willamette for that…

Cheers.

not meaning to ‘punt’ on you, but I would honestly just go by taste. Try it once fermentation has completed, and if you think it needs a little more hop aroma, dry hop that $#@er.

Worst-case, if it is a bitter mess, you can brew another less-hoppy batch and blend.

I’m not so sure it will affect bitterness and can’t figure out why this would happen if it did. With the hops removed, wouldn’t the effect of bittering (seems to me anyways) be stalled even with more boiling? I’m at work so no PM/BS, but if someone has access to BS… is the bittering from 60 to 90 minutes with the hops in the kettle that drastic? Curious because with the hops removed, the change would be minimal IMO. If you left all your hops in, that would be a completely different situation.

What I do think will be affected is your aroma and probably some flavor but you already know that.

I guess in a pinch, you could have added extract for a 5 min boil to bump your points up. Or just run with your current OG for less alcohol.

[quote=“Silentknyght”]“Less flavor and aroma” in a malt-forward, scottish-ale-yeast-using “winter warmer” style?

I suppose what I’m asking about is what to expect, specifically, from a 10-minute addition of an ounce of willamette hops in a malty beer, so I know whether or how to adjust mine to taste.[/quote]

I never read the recipe. I didn’t know you were doing a Scottish style. In that case, you really don’t need any hop flavor or aroma. Your 10-minute hop addition is going to turn into more of a bittering addition similar to if you had added it at 25-30 minutes. So your beer will have very little or no hop flavor but a tad more bitterness. Probably not a big deal in a Scottish style winter warmer.

Back to Shopping at NorthernBrewer.com