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Dry Yeast

I am forced to use dry yeast due to no LHBS in my area so I order everything and I live in a hot climate so I error on the side of caution. My question is other then rehydrating the yeast before pitching does any one have any other tips for using dry yeast. I have read so much about a yeast starter being the best way to go for bigger beers, can dry yeast do the job?

The dry yeast have come along way. There biggest issue is the variety, and some people don’t like any of the lager strains.

For a 5 gallon batch, I would be comfortable with 1 packet of dry yeast for an OG up to 1.070. Above that use 2 packets.

Mr Malty breaks it down for partial packets starting at 1.060

http://www.mrmalty.com/calc/calc.html

When the weather turns favorable, you can order some of the specialty strains like the Belgium and lagers if you like. Keep them in the refrigerator until you want to use them. Then make a small volume starter to get them going, then a larger one to build the cell count back up.

The topic of pitching dry vs. rehydrating is one of those things that will get a reaction, some will swear by one or the other method. I’ve even seen one of the dry yeast manufacturer’s website that gave instructions for both methods. The truth is that both ways work.

I have dry-pitched a few batches and they worked great. I rehydrated for one batch, and it worked great, but it made me nervous about picking up an infection or accidentally cooking the yeast with the warm/hot water, so my preference has been to pitch dry. There are usually enough cells in the pack so that the lag is short. And for the liquid guys out there, keeping a packet of dry yeast on hand in the fridge is a great backstop in case your “plan A” yeast doesn’t kick off.

[quote=“twdjr1”]The topic of pitching dry vs. rehydrating is one of those things that will get a reaction, some will swear by one or the other method. I’ve even seen one of the dry yeast manufacturer’s website that gave instructions for both methods. The truth is that both ways work.

I have dry-pitched a few batches and they worked great. I rehydrated for one batch, and it worked great, but it made me nervous about picking up an infection or accidentally cooking the yeast with the warm/hot water, so my preference has been to pitch dry. There are usually enough cells in the pack so that the lag is short. And for the liquid guys out there, keeping a packet of dry yeast on hand in the fridge is a great backstop in case your “plan A” yeast doesn’t kick off.[/quote]

+1 on most of that. I only tend to dry pitch and have never had any problems. Since I’ve been hearing so much about rehydrating lately I was thinking of starting to do this, but how much difference would I actually notice? If it is a lot I will do it for sure.

For the most part I use dry yeast in about 80% of my beer. Partly for cost / partly because the only dealer in my area keeps old stock of liquid around too long. If I brewed more often I’d try saving liquid yeasts.

The selection is pretty week with dry, so I do try to get liquid once in a while.

I have rehydrated and just pitched the dry yeast. I haven’t really noticed any difference. Then again I tend to use WL or WY so I have only used dry about a dozen times.

I use a lot of US-05 and have noted repeatedly that rehydration of the yeast and/or oxygenation of the wort both have a positive impact on the lag time and thus shorten the overall fermentation time, but they have no impact on the FG.

Good to know. For the most part I have not seen lag time as a huge issue for me, but since the 05 can be used for cooler fermentations I can see how rehydration might help quite a bit there.

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