Dry Hop in Fermenter?

I have a sMasH made with 2-row and cascade hops that have been in the fermenter for 2 weeks now. I was wondering if I can cold crash and dry hop at the same time the the primary? Or is it best to transfer to secondary to dry hop? Also, is dry hopping while cold crashing ok(secondary or primary)? This will be the first dry hop i’ve done in years and would rather not screw anything up.

Thanks

If I DH in the primary it’s usually at room temperature but I also DH in the keg at serving temp with gas on. IME you can do either with pretty similar results.

I dry hop in the primary for 5 days, then cold crash for 2 days.

This is my typical procedure as well.

So I’ve pretty much got myself tied up in knots trying to decide whether to cold crash my PTE “2.0” or just carefully siphon as best I can. I’ve read a bunch of posts / threads here and on other sites and still am unsure about the best approach…I’ve dry hopped twice per instructions(straight in no bags) and have a few days to decide. Pros : clearer ale, less hop debris floating around, easier siphoning// Cons: concerns about losing precious hop oils and aroma, delayed carbonation// appreciate any feedback and experience you might have?
Bob

Tying a fine mesh strainer bag on the outlet of your syphon hose does a really good job of keeping the hops out of your bottling bucket. Just leave the bag as loose as possible so you have a lot of outlet area, and there shouldn’t be much if any increased risk of oxidation. All the hops stay in the bag, syphon doesn’t clog, clear beer!

I’m about to dry hop an IPA in the primary(first dry hop here too). I’m planning on attaching a small mesh bag on the siphon outlet when racking to my bottling bucket.

I seldom use a secondary, but I’ve started racking the beer to secondary before dry hopping. By getting the beer off the yeast before adding dry hops you avoid potential issues of getting a “flowery” hop aroma.

Where’d you hear that?

I heard its good to crash your yeast, but I never really knew why, and how, yeast interfered with dry hops. I rarely ever go to secondary, often just to a keg to dry hop.

The yeast in suspension can clump together or bind with the hop oils and pull it out of your beer when it flocs. Never tried it first-hand, though, so I don’t know how much of an effect it can have, or if it’s just more of an internet myth.

I’ve tried it both ways and when the dry hop load gets bigger I’ve preferred it when I dry hop in the keg. Haven’t done any controlled study with split batches or anything but I feel like I’ve been having better results when I transfer to a CO2 purged keg and dry hop in there. Also not certain if I’m maybe getting better results because of less oxygen exposure.

Where’d you hear that?

I heard its good to crash your yeast, but I never really knew why, and how, yeast interfered with dry hops. I rarely ever go to secondary, often just to a keg to dry hop.[/quote]

Stan Hieronymus wrote about it in Zymurgy. He wrote that interactin between yeast and hops can cause inceased levels of geraniol. I had just experienced that before I read about it, so I brewed another batch of the same beer but racked to secondary before dry hopping. Sure enough, the hop aroma was waht it was supposed to be withouth the rose scent to it.

Where’d you hear that?

I heard its good to crash your yeast, but I never really knew why, and how, yeast interfered with dry hops. I rarely ever go to secondary, often just to a keg to dry hop.[/quote]

Stan Hieronymus wrote about it in Zymurgy. He wrote that interactin between yeast and hops can cause inceased levels of geraniol. I had just experienced that before I read about it, so I brewed another batch of the same beer but racked to secondary before dry hopping. Sure enough, the hop aroma was waht it was supposed to be withouth the rose scent to it.[/quote]

Rose huh? Interesting. I think I’ll wipe the dust off those better bottles and give it a try.