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Does decanting = loss o Low Flocc'ers?

I like making step up yeast starters to get the most out of a smack pack.

Q: When making step-up yeast starters, or decanting in general and pouring off the excess liquid out of a chilled starter, am I loosing a significant amount of the less flocculant yeasties? Especially with some of the French-belgo saison fellas. Thanks to all for the input!!!

Just cause I know it might come up- my procedure is ferm 2-5L for 24-36hrs, shaking or recently stir plating. Chill for 24-48 hrs. Torch the mouth and pour off skanky beer. Then, depending on how big a cake I need do it again. Cheers!

Logically the answer would be …

A very large percentage of your yeast should be at the bottom of your starter vessel. Sure you probably lose some yeast but not nearly enough to make a difference in results.

depends on how much has settled and how carefully your pour

depends on how much has settled and how carefully your pour

I’ve read this theory (that longer settlement periods and decanting cause you to dump the lower floculent yeast, and promote the growth/continuance of higher floculant yeast) in old brewing documents. However, in my experience at the homebrew level, I’ve seen no discernible difference. I get roughly the same numbers regardless of whether I’ve allowed my starters to fully settle, or if I’ve used them when there is still some suspended yeast.

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