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Did I screw up? - All Grain Mash Question

So I did an all grain batch yesterday which I was trying to do an Imperial IPA with a good body (mash around 154).

The mash temp was right on for an hour but after I collected the first runnings I left the first running sitting in my kettle until I collected my two batch sparges after the mash. I figure the first mash running (sitting in the kettle) temperature dropped down to 140 for around 20 minutes. Then I began my boil after the sparges. I did not realize that the enzymatic conversion continues in the kettle until the temp is raised above 170 F… Always learning something.

So, my question is do you think my beer is going to be more dry/less body than I was hoping for since the first running probably sat in the 140 temp range(Beta) for 20 minutes?

I also used 0.75 lb caramel 80, 0.75 lb melanoidin, 0.75 lb cara 45, and 1 lb of munich 10L so do you think those will help keep some body in the beer even though I let my kettle temp drop while I was sparging?

In my experience, yes, you have created a more fermentable wort. But with an IIPA, I would think this would be favored over drinking a cloyingly sweet one.

With 1.5 lb crystal malts in there, I think you’re going to be just fine. :cheers:

And it’s a waste of time doing two sparges unless your mash tun is too small to fit all the water at once.

As I understand enzymes:

Alpha amylase is most active from about 140 through the low 150s and is deactivated in the mid 150s.

Beta amylase is most active from the high 140s through the low 160s.

I think that means that most of the alpha amylase would have been deactivated by your 154 rest. Once the wort cooled into the 140s only a small portion of alpha amylase would still be available and the wort would be too cool for the beta amylase to be very active. I’ve used “about” and “most” because the enzymes don’t have sharp on-off points and we’re dealing with biochemical systems that are highly variable.

Or, to summarize: I doubt you’ll see much reduction in the body because of the extended period at 140. Others have already pointed out that the crystal malt will also counter-act any thinning of the mouth feel. I expect you’ll have full-bodied beer.

If anyone sees this differently, please let me know what I’ve overlooked.

Dawg- only that beta amylase is the lower temp. one and alpha the higher one. To me it seems backassward, so that’s how I remember which is which. :lol:

Old_Dawg, I think you are overestimating the rate at which enzymes will be denatured when moderately above their optimal range. The higher the temperature, the faster the enzymes will denature. At only a few degrees over the optimal active range, a significant amount of the be beta-amylase will still be around after the 154 rest. This beer will be dryer than the OP was planning on, but with that much crystal it should still have plenty of body.

Got it bassackwards - again!

Thanks for the insights on enzyme activity versus deactivation temps. I’m assuming the enzyme activity follows a bell curve along the temperature range and assumed that they would begin to degrade as the temperature approached the upper end of the activity curve - in spite of having no data to tell me that.

Can anyone provide some data on enzyme deactivation temperatures. It’s probably in some common references that I’ve forgotten or overlooked.

[quote=“Old_Dawg”]Got it bassackwards - again!

Thanks for the insights on enzyme activity versus deactivation temps. I’m assuming the enzyme activity follows a bell curve along the temperature range and assumed that they would begin to degrade as the temperature approached the upper end of the activity curve - in spite of having no data to tell me that.

Can anyone provide some data on enzyme deactivation temperatures. It’s probably in some common references that I’ve forgotten or overlooked.[/quote]

[quote=“Old_Dawg”]Got it bassackwards - again!

Thanks for the insights on enzyme activity versus deactivation temps. I’m assuming the enzyme activity follows a bell curve along the temperature range and assumed that they would begin to degrade as the temperature approached the upper end of the activity curve - in spite of having no data to tell me that.

Can anyone provide some data on enzyme deactivation temperatures. It’s probably in some common references that I’ve forgotten or overlooked.[/quote]

Thanks Denny. That’s definitely worth posting twice!

Oops! :oops:

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