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Diacetyl Test

Can you use a diacetyl test on your finished/bottled beer in addition to beer samples directly taken from a fermentation vessel?

Thanks!

A diacetyl test? You mean tasting the beer?

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Exactly what I was thinking… but didn’t want me or the OP to fell stupid by asking.

Exactly what I was thinking… but didn’t want me or the OP to fell stupid by asking.[/quote]

I specialize in being stupid!

Oops sorry guys I should have been a bit more descriptive. I’m referring to the process in which you heat up a sample of the beer fermenting in a carboy/vessel or in my case finished/bottled beer for 10-20 minutes and then cool it back down to room temperature and compare the heated version to the regular version to find any diacetyl differences. The process is lined out here:

http://www.professorbeer.com/articles/diacetyl.html

I was just wondering if it would be acceptable to use a bottled version of the beer instead of the fermenting product?

I need help with diacetyl test but cant post a new topic. Questions below

diacetyl will smell like butter, not popcorn

sorry my bad it reminded me of buttered popcorn…it was more a butter smell.

@denny with the assist nearly a decade later!

I brew a lot of lagers, and I make sure I get a nice long warm up after the fermentation time has been sufficient. I’ve heard diacetyl described as a slick mouth feel/coating of the tongue as well as the aforementioned butter aroma.

The closest I think I’ve come to diacetyl however is drinking Pilsner Urquell.

I wonder how DaanyBoy would feel… Talking about his beloved P.U… Wait… PU? :joy:
Sneezles61

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I found out the butter smell is more discernable if you let the ball jar sit for a couple hours. If anyone uses this test, do it first with a fermenting sample that you know would have diacetyl so you can learn the smell as well as the procedures.

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Uh oh… Mr. Mike… yer texting yer-self… :grin:
Sneezles61

Sneezles sometimes its the only way to have an intelligent conversation :slight_smile:

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outch

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Given sufficient pitch of healthy yeast and time for it to work, no d rest is necessary. It comes from commercial brewers trying to rush lagers through production.

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Ah yes, but a quick search of the NB forum archives yields an absolute metric S__t ton of posts from unhappy brewers with butter bombs. So it happens frequently at the home brew level.

DA rests could be seen as cheap insurance.

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@voodoo_donut I totally agree. Cheap insurance to raise temps to mid 60°s for a few days. With that, if you get diacetyl, you’ll know. It’s REAL easy to detect.

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You are right my attempt at a joke was out of line…sorry sneezles

You needn’t apologize for anything… You gotta have some fun, eh? :sunglasses:
Sneezles61

thanks for understanding

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