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Deluxe Brewers Kit Question + rant

Hello brewers this is my first post. I have never brewed before but I’m very excited to give it a shot. I am looking at buying the Deluxe kit to get started with the Slobber recipe. I noticed on retailmenot a $20 gift certificate applied to next purchase as a promo (promo code). I figure once I make my purchase I’ll use it down the road to get a recipe kit or something.

I was looking in the comment rating on the deluxe kit and a guy said he wished he had held out to buy because soon the kit will be offered with a free burner as a promo or something. I was wondering if anyone else has any knowledge of any such thing?

Also as far as going glass or plastic on the carboy does it really make a difference on quality of the batch? What is the upshot on glass vs plastic? Is it like the grocery store when they say paper or plastic and it just some kinda preference thing.

Lastly I really am not into investing into glass bottles I have enough of my own here for more than a 5 gallon batch. These are commercial brown glass, non twist off bottles of course I will sanitize that should fly right?

I think awhile back NB offered a special which provided a free burner if you bought the deluxe kit. Most stores will give special offers like tht around the holiday season.

Glass vs. Plastic: glass is not air permeable nor can it be scratched. It doesn’t flex when moved either. The big complaint though is that it is dangerous when dropped… which does happen.

Plastic can allow air to permeate the beer eventually. It can easily be scratched which can harbor bacteria which can lead to infection. They don’t break.

Me, I have glass as plastic was just coming around when I started. You will find that people use many different methods with success. Kind of depends on how you started and how you learned and what works best for you.

Thanks, I’m going for glass it’s worth the risk it sounds.

I opted for glass carboys too with my Deluxe Starter Kit and don’t regret it at all. My only advice for you is to consider plastic if you have young children running around the house. Although these carboys are very durable, they aren’t invincible and would produce extremely large shards of glass if broken. I’ve heard some horror stories about it.

Also, if going glass, look into the Brew Hauler or a similar moving harness. It will make carrying the carboy much safer and easier, especially when it’s full.

Regarding your question on bottles… brown commercial non-twist off bottles will work fine. Just make sure you clean them well. I use PBW and a bottle brush (both included in your Deluxe Starter Kit) after they’ve soaked overnight in the PBW/water solution. Oxiclean works too if you run out of PBW. Rinse them out with water after you scrub them good. Then sanitize them with Star San (also included in your kit) just prior to bottling. Sanitizing alone won’t cut it when you’re reusing bottles. I’ve only gotten away with just sanitizing (no cleaning) when the bottles are brand new out of the box.

:cheers:

I started with glass. I have plastic too. Bought two plastic buckets after I dropped one glass carboy. That is not something you want to go thru, so be vigilant. I’ve seen no difference in the final beer product from each.

Cheers

The plastic used for buckets is gas permeable, but not enough so to be an issue if you aren’t bulk aging in buckets.

The plastic used in plastic carboys that are specifically designed for homebrew use is not gas permeable to any practical measure. (This is why soda that comes in plastic bottles doesn’t go flat.) If the gas diffusing through the wall of the carboy were a kid riding his bike across your lawn, then the gas getting in through and around your airlock would be some guy driving a loaded semi through it on a rainy day. And you’ll be using an airlock no matter what kind of fermentor you choose.

I feel the plastic vs. glass decision is based on preference. Like stated already air can get into buckets but you shouldn’t have to worry about it unless your aging beers for a long period of time. Also on the scratches that could grow bacteria side…if your using proper cleaning methods whats there to worry about? And what are people doing to scratch their buckets in the first place?

When I started brewing I was a poor college student so the decision between glass or plastic was made for me. On my 20th batch with my original primary and have had zero issues. I would like to have some glass ones through to age my bourbon stouts and other oak beers.

It’s homebrewing, your in control so do what you want.

Prost!

[quote=“jethrobrewing”]I feel the plastic vs. glass decision is based on preference. Like stated already air can get into buckets but you shouldn’t have to worry about it unless your aging beers for a long period of time. Also on the scratches that could grow bacteria side…if your using proper cleaning methods whats there to worry about? And what are people doing to scratch their buckets in the first place?

When I started brewing I was a poor college student so the decision between glass or plastic was made for me. On my 20th batch with my original primary and have had zero issues. I would like to have some glass ones through to age my bourbon stouts and other oak beers.

It’s homebrewing, your in control so do what you want.

Prost![/quote]
They are very easy to scratch with a scrub pad, a carboy brush, stacking them, etc.

[quote=“Loopie Beer”][quote=“jethrobrewing”]I feel the plastic vs. glass decision is based on preference. Like stated already air can get into buckets but you shouldn’t have to worry about it unless your aging beers for a long period of time. Also on the scratches that could grow bacteria side…if your using proper cleaning methods whats there to worry about? And what are people doing to scratch their buckets in the first place?

When I started brewing I was a poor college student so the decision between glass or plastic was made for me. On my 20th batch with my original primary and have had zero issues. I would like to have some glass ones through to age my bourbon stouts and other oak beers.

It’s homebrewing, your in control so do what you want.

Prost![/quote]
They are very easy to scratch with a scrub pad, a carboy brush, stacking them, etc.[/quote]

Just soak them in hot water and PBW no scrubbing required. I wouldn’t stacking them in each other, only wort and cleaner goes in my buckets.

Just soak them in hot water and PBW no scrubbing required. I wouldn’t stacking them in each other, only wort and cleaner goes in my buckets.[/quote]

Man now you got me all paranoid. I have limited space to store my brewing equipment so i put stuff in my bottling bucket all the time including another bucket.

X2 on the brew hauler I got 2, one for each of my carboys. I would suggest a bigmouth bubbler for a primary fermentor as well. If I were buying today I would get one or 2, they weren’t an option when my kit was purchased.

I finally got a look at the Big Mouth Bubbler in person at Midwest last weekend. It looked cool, but then I noticed that they were selling replacement gaskets right next to the bubbler, 5 to a packet. I took a closer look at the gasket, and it is very thin. I could see it getting wrecked pretty easily. I decided to hold off on buying one until there’s bit more customer feedback.

As for your stash of bottles, just put them to soak in a tub of hot water. I scrub out the laundry sink and load that full. I hook up a short washing machine supply hose to fill the bottles with. Sprinkle a little bit of Oxyclean (or Walmart’s generic brand Sun Oxygen Cleanser) into each bottle, and let them soak. Labels and crud should all loosen up overnight. Then give them a blast with a bottle washer, sanitize, and you’re good to go.

Enjoy your new obsession! :cheers:

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