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Corny cask

I have been reading about converting a corny into a “cask” type vessel. I understand it is lacking a lot of the serving equipment ect. I was more just interested in trying it. So I have a keg that I reversed the dip tube on. Planned on making a wood stand to keep it propped up. I was then going to connect a tube to the gas connect and elevate it in case beer were to come out it? Other then that serving would be fairly simple allowing the pressure of the beer and gravity to serve once carbonated. My question is how long will it stay good for? What kind of flavor timeline can I realistically expect. I have read something that said 5 days max and something else that said 14 days max. The “cask” would be stored at 60 degrees F. This is slightly high I think? It’s what I can do though with the coldest back room of my basement. Thanks.

I’m not sure what you mean by “reversing” the dip tube? I don’t think beer will last even 5 days at 60 deg allowing air in.

By reverse I meant you tip the keg so the beer is on the top. Pour out of the small co2 in tube instead of the long one. I wasn’t sure if I should put something over the gas in to only allow a little oxygen draw or what.

Physics is going to dictate how much air in let into the keg. If not enough is let in to replace the beer that exits, the beer will stop flowing.

Personally I would only do this with an amount of beer that I felt would be consumed in the day/evening.

The little 5L mini kegs would be great for this. You could also build a “beer engine”.

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f35/fellow- ... ine-10529/

You can also replace the headspace of the keg with co2 instead of oxygen. It is not as traditional, but it seems a little more practical for homebrewers wanting to keep five gallons of beer around for more than a couple of days.

The only reason I wanted to try this was to taste the flavor change over the few days it stayed good. What do you guys think about having a wood piece in the end of the vent tube to restrict oxygen in. That seems to be the only thing the NB kit uses and they say it will last a few days. I could kill it in a few days would just have to plan it around the weekend so I could bring a bunch out in growlers. I also saw a set up similar to this inside a big cooler with a bag of ice to keep it chilled I would probably do that. I enjoy my Belgian and bigger beers warmer with less gas but 60 degrees to cup might be a little hard to drink a whole lot of. Also the beer engine. Doesn’t that refill the keg with oxygen also?

http://www.northernbrewer.com/shop/home ... -base.html

Nighhawk I didn’t see your link at first. That is pretty rad I’m reading it now and not a lot of money at all.

I have not tried this, but I agree that I would do it at some sort of a party where it was going to get consumed in a pretty short time. Or, I would just hook it up to the CO2 tank at about 1psi and replace the emptying head space with CO2 instead of O2. Or, even those little CO2 cartridge adapters maybe. Like this:

http://www.northernbrewer.com/shop/soda ... arger.html

[quote=“Mike Chapman”]The only reason I wanted to try this was to taste the flavor change over the few days it stayed good. What do you guys think about having a wood piece in the end of the vent tube to restrict oxygen in. That seems to be the only thing the NB kit uses and they say it will last a few days. I could kill it in a few days would just have to plan it around the weekend so I could bring a bunch out in growlers. I also saw a set up similar to this inside a big cooler with a bag of ice to keep it chilled I would probably do that. I enjoy my Belgian and bigger beers warmer with less gas but 60 degrees to cup might be a little hard to drink a whole lot of. Also the beer engine. Doesn’t that refill the keg with oxygen also?

http://www.northernbrewer.com/shop/home ... -base.html[/quote]

See my previous post. Something MUST replace the space of the beer or the beer WILL NOT FLOW.

Example. Fill your siphon hose with water. Hold your finger on one end and drop the other. The water will stay in the hose. Add a little air and a little water will flow. Then stop. Same with the keg. You have to allow as much O2 into the top of the keg as you allowed the beer to go out.

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