Back to Shopping at NorthernBrewer.com

Cold crashing a yeast starter

I am making a two step yeast starter for an Oktoberfest. I had it on the stir plate 36 hours. Before leaving for work I took it off the stir plate and let it sit still at room temperature until I get home in the morning at which time I will place it in the fridge.
How many days should I cold crash this starter before making the second step starter?

With lagers I do exactly as you have done, up till now. Generally 24 hours in fridge, but then I decant and do the next stage in a gallon jug, which does not work on my stir plate. So I do the “shake every time I think about it method”.

This is my first lager ever. I used YeastCalc to figure out the starter.
The starters are 1600 ml each. If 24 hours is good, then another day or two shouldn’t hurt. I was planning on doing the second part on Thursday or Friday. Before you pitch your gallon starter, I suppose you decant that also? I was planning on decanting the first and final starter before pitching.
Thank you
Brad

Yes I decant the big one so you have to allow time for cold crashing that as well

The second starter went on the stir plate Friday afternoon. I am keeping it on the stir plate until I leave for work at 04:30 Monday. At which time I will get it in the freezer with the external controller set for 35 degrees. It will stay there until I brew on Thursday morning. Sound OK?

This sounds about right from a timing perspective, but I’d say the time to complete fermentation of your starter is dependent on several factors: difference in yeast/wort temp, ambient air temp, amount of viable yeast cells, oxygenation level, gravity of starter, etc.

For me, I watch the activity of my starter and then give it an extra 8-12 hours on the stir plate, rather then saying “I’m going to cold crash at 8:30 AM on Friday”.

[quote=“BradleyRd.Brewer”]This sounds about right from a timing perspective, but I’d say the time to complete fermentation of your starter is dependent on several factors: difference in yeast/wort temp, ambient air temp, amount of viable yeast cells, oxygenation level, gravity of starter, etc.

For me, I watch the activity of my starter and then give it an extra 8-12 hours on the stir plate, rather then saying “I’m going to cold crash at 8:30 AM on Friday”.[/quote]

I have to totally agree with what you are saying. When I ferment beer I don’t pick a time to keg. I let the refractometer tell me when the beer is done fermenting.
The starter was on the stir plate for about 57 hours before cold crashing it. I looked at the starter every day and didn’t see too much difference. What do you see that I should pay attention to? I did notice it seemed to get a little thicker but that was about it. Another question. I’m using a 2000 ml flasks for both starters. The yeast from the first starter seemed to cover the bottom of the flask. I checked the second starter tonight and noticed so far that there is not much more than the first starter. I expected to see at least maybe a 1/4 inch thick layer on the bottom. But I really don’t know how much there should be, that was just guessing.

The activity I’m looking for are the CO2 bubbles coming out of solution. Once there’s no more CO2 coming out of the beer, that’s when I start my 8-12 hour clock before the crash.

That said, I just recently made an exception to this. I made a starter for a Dry London Ale yeast and the yeast started to floculate so aggressively that I didn’t worry about waiting a certain amount of time, I just turned off the stir plate and stuck the starter in the fridge.

Back to Shopping at NorthernBrewer.com