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Cloudy layers in fermentor

Hello all,
I’m a relatively new brewer (only done about 4 batches), on my latest batch, i took NB’s ak47 pale mild, and substituted the corn sugar with ames honey after boil (using the right conversion factor). i’ve noticed that the wort has become stratified into 2 layers, the top being a tranlucent amber color, however the bottom layer is the color of coffee with a lot of creamer in it (its opaque). Its been in the fermentor for 3 weeks.

Any help as to what this may be would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks!

also some other factors that may or may not have to do with this is that i used tap water and had to use a blow off tube for a day after yeast was added.

How thick is the bottom layer? If it is only an inch or two thick I’ll bet that it is the layer of yeast and trub that has fallen out of suspension.

its about 1/2 to 2/3 on the bottom

I recently attempted my first batch of all grain beer and experiencing cloudiness in the whole batch. I am in the secondary fermentation process and heading into week 2. The beer smells fine and taste fine. Are whole grain beers suppose to be cloudy? I’ve always used the extracts before and not encountered this issue. I know with wine you have to degasse for clarification, is that something I could do with the this beer or is there something I need to add and let it stay in the 2ndary a bit longer?

Sue Ellen

JT, I would gently swirl the carboy and get it all the same color and take a hydro reading, to make sure it is done. My next step would be to cold crash the whole thing and it should drop clear. I put corn syrup in a batch recently and it stayed cloudy for a long time (don’t think the syrup had anything to do with it). It finally dropped clear slowly.

Sue are you getting your PH water adjustments right? Is it cloudy out of the MT or going into the fermentor? Just reread your post and it sounds like there maybe plenty of yeast still in suspension. Cold crash or just give it more time.

[quote=“Sue Ellen”]I recently attempted my first batch of all grain beer and experiencing cloudiness in the whole batch. I am in the secondary fermentation process and heading into week 2. The beer smells fine and taste fine. Are whole grain beers suppose to be cloudy? I’ve always used the extracts before and not encountered this issue. I know with wine you have to degasse for clarification, is that something I could do with the this beer or is there something I need to add and let it stay in the 2ndary a bit longer?

Sue Ellen[/quote]

You know that is quite funny, 6 months ago I did my first AG batch in the BIAB method with NB’s Cream Ale and when it was in the fermenter it came out crystal clear. Using Safale S-04 6 days in primary and 2 weeks in secondary. Don’t ask why 6 days in primary I just did it. When i bottled my beer in clear corona bottles the Cream ale was absolutely beautifully clear, but 3 months ago i made NB’s Cream Ale again this time with a proper mashtun and i used Wyeast 1084 Irish Ale, the beer came out cloudy and this one i let it sit 4 weeks in primary and 2 weeks in secondary. I was trying to figure out why it turned out the way it did and the only solution i have is that I used a yeast with high flocculation on my first try and on the second time i used a yeast with medium flocculation. Perhaps it could be the yeast, why don’t you post what types of yeast you were using? The same thing goes for my irish red ales. I made 2 at two different point in time and the Safale S-04 came out with clearer beer each time and all of my beers have never used any clarification ingredients.

Forgot the picture, this was my first AG BIAB beer made with Safale s04

I am brewing the Lefse Blonde Belgian Ale and used the whole grain kit with the Wyeast Belgian Abbey. So maybe it is the yeast as you stated.

JT,
I’ve got well water and never have had a problem. I have made several batches of wine and many batches of beer using the extract kits. I’ve never worried about PH and it didn’t say anything about taking PH in the limited instructions I got with the kit. So what is cold crashing? I am new to the ALL GRAIN and honestly I’m not sure I am into all the work. I got the all grain kit thinking I was getting a kit where you seeped the grain in a bag. What a surprise when I opened that box, 8 pounds of grain. So after all my research in figuring things out, I made a big grain bag from muslin and put it in my cooler with the hot water. Swished it around, kept it warm and moved it as if to stir it a few times during that hour. I found the instructions a bit vague and left a lot to assumption that the brewer would know certain things about brewing with grains. For a first time brewer of an ALL grain kit, I must say I have felt a bit over whelmed by it. I am wondering if I may have needed to crush the grains. I thought they were all ready to go. The other thought I have had is that my water was too hot and destroyed the natural sugars in the grain. I was thinking that my makeshift tung (cooler) wouldn’t hold the heat all that well and things would cool down. It didn’t. So…What is cold crashing all about?..

when you ordered the grains there was a crush option. you could have gotten them pre-crushed, or you should have crushed them yourself.

cold crashing is something you do after fermentation, to drop yeast out of suspension. its when you put your fermenter in a cold environment say 35 degrees F. this causes sediment/yeast/hops to drop to the bottom resulting in a clearer beer. it can be done with extract too. BUT its not a necessary step.

you said you steeped your grains in a large muslin bag. this is called the All grain Brew in a Bag Method. and it works. you Can get very clear beers this way. if the beer taste fine, and smells fine, chances are it is fine, it may be the yeast, it may be a fluke. what temperature and how long did you let them soak in the water? are you sure the grains weren’t crushed?

edit addition: good luck! :cheers:

I think BTV did an episode on brew in a bag (biab). Look it up and check it out! I hope your beer turns out great.

I seeped the bag for an hour like it said in one of the youtube video’s I watched on making whole grain beers. The temp, was above 170, but I thought it would cool down quicker than it did. I must have a good cooler. As for the crushed or not crushed I don’t remember there being a selection option when I ordered. I actually think it was crushed, but not 100% sure. I guess it won’t hurt to let it sit another week or so in the secondary and see if it clears. Actually haven’t looked at it in almost 2 weeks. Saturday I was to bottle, but maybe I’ll wait…So my Muslin bag idea was a good one then. It sure was less messy in the long run. live and learn…I’ll let you all know how it turned out, just might be a ladies beer (light weight)

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