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Clone Brews -- useful recipes?

Cool. :cheers:

[quote=“GarretD”][quote=“Denny”]

If Odell IPA is not in it it’s worthless ! LOL J/K…

Really…The best place is just use the internet, I have a few books and the best one is my hop book. The Mitch Steele Stone one is not all the great IMO. I get my clones off the boards and have yet to ever use one from a book.[/quote][/quote]

I have a stellar clone recipe that I’ve been honing if you’re interested. Biggest hurdle is that they use a hop back… kinda hard to imitate.

Clone Brews has been revised in the past few years, and the recipes that have been added and changed since the 1st addition are much better. Nevertheless, it is geared towards extract brewers, so I wouldn’t really recommend it as a resource for all-grain brewers. I’ve brewed several of the Szamatulski’s recipes and they always made solid, to-style beer, even if it wasn’t an exact clone of the commercial brew.

And no, the recipe in Clone Brews does NOT contain pear extract.

[quote=“Hoppenheimer”][quote=“GarretD”][quote=“Denny”]

If Odell IPA is not in it it’s worthless ! LOL J/K…

Really…The best place is just use the internet, I have a few books and the best one is my hop book. The Mitch Steele Stone one is not all the great IMO. I get my clones off the boards and have yet to ever use one from a book.[/quote][/quote]

I have a stellar clone recipe that I’ve been honing if you’re interested. Biggest hurdle is that they use a hop back… kinda hard to imitate.[/quote]

Sure…I can always use another recipe :slight_smile: Shoot me a PM with it.

[quote=“Wahoo”]Clone Brews has been revised in the past few years, and the recipes that have been added and changed since the 1st addition are much better. Nevertheless, it is geared towards extract brewers, so I wouldn’t really recommend it as a resource for all-grain brewers. I’ve brewed several of the Szamatulski’s recipes and they always made solid, to-style beer, even if it wasn’t an exact clone of the commercial brew.

And no, the recipe in Clone Brews does NOT contain pear extract.[/quote]

It used to!

Good to hear about the revisions.

  1. I’ve got a copy of Clone Brews, 2010 edition – is this the revised version you spoke of?

  2. Can you expand on the issue of how Clone Brews target recipes for extract brewers and how that diminishes the recipes listed for all grain, ie. how would the recipes differ if they were targeting all grain brewers? I’ve seen that recipes from home brew suppliers take essentially the same approach, substituting extract for the base malts while maintaining the specialty grain and altering hop levels.

[quote=“Antwerp”]1. I’ve got a copy of Clone Brews, 2010 edition – is this the revised version you spoke of?

  1. Can you expand on the issue of how Clone Brews target recipes for extract brewers and how that diminishes the recipes listed for all grain, ie. how would the recipes differ if they were targeting all grain brewers? I’ve seen that recipes from home brew suppliers take essentially the same approach, substituting extract for the base malts while maintaining the specialty grain and altering hop levels.[/quote]

Yep, the 2010 version is the new one.

So, the answer to your second question is quite complex. But in a nutshell, here it is. There are a limited number of extracts available on the market, and so when you fine tune a recipe for extract and then simply replace the extract with base malt, you are sort of limited (even with the all grain recipe) to the types of grain which extract is available for. It’s not that the problem is that they are “targeting” extract brewers… it’s that the recipes, as far as I can tell, are written first with extract in mind. Then there is a substitution made for all grain, so that the extract recipe has an all-grain version. But if you were writing an all-grain recipe from scratch, you would have a much wider array of grains available.

I am trying to think of a suitable analogy… I am sure I could explain it better if I wasn’t so tired!

Below is a compilation of CYBI recipes from the Brewing Network.

Most are right from the brewers and few I’ve brewed are pretty solid.

Also google Avery brewing homebrew recipes. The brewer give 90% of the recipe and the IPA and Brown ale are spot on.

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f12/can-you ... se-178064/

Sorry… tl:dr.

I have Clonebrews and also Beer Captured and my take on both is that they are good to have and good to read as long as you don’t necessarily want to clone anything. Their recipes for various beers are not accurate and I only know that after getting some good inside information from breweries about what goes into their beers and the Clonebrews recipes were quite inaccurate. But… there is some decent stuff that you can pick up from these books and I like Beer Captured more than Clonebrews. There was also North American Clonebrews which was not written by the Szamatulskis and is filled with errors. Don’t looks to these books to perfectly recreate a certain recipe but more to understand how to attack a certain style. I especially like the English Bitter/Pale Ale/ESB section of Beer Captured. As for DGB… I like it as well and I like the fact that it digs a little deeper about water, which grains and/or hops to use, which yeasts best fit the beer, etc. I also would suggest that many things in print could be outdated and that live forum help can get you where you want to go quicker.

I’ve personally never been a great fan of Designing Great Beers. It’s enjoyable to read, but unfortunately Daniels has limited info on commercial examples and instead relies on competition homebrews to guide what should go into a beer style. That doesn’t always make for the best guidance…

I’ve tried a very small number of recipes that were billed as clones, and none of them succeeded as clones even though they were decent beers. I’ve brewed a large number of the Brewing Classic Styles recipes & modified many to fit my tastes or ingredients, and all of them have been outstanding beers. It is my go-to recipe book each time I’m considering what to brew next.

Even if you get the recipe from the brewery you may not get an exact “clone” because of the differences in your home brewery from the commercial brewery. Two different home brewers will also get two somewhat different beers: not bad, just different.

The “Can You Brew It” podcasts are great resources for cloning. Though they obviously don’t help if you want to brew a beer they don’t try to clone, but they certainly give you guidance as to how to approach it (step 1: call the brewery and see if they will give you the recipe).

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