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Bry 97 yeast by Danstar

Afternoon all,

Brewed an all Columbus pale ale today and decided to use a packet of Danstar’s BRY 97 West Coast Yeast.

Here was my recipe-

8 lbs pale
1 lb c20
1 lb american Vienna
.5 lb carapils
.5 lb cane sugar

.5 oz Columbus @ fwh
.5 oz Columbus @ 60
2 oz Columbus @ flameout
Planning on an oz or two to dry hop too.

Never used Columbus solo, and never used the Bry 97 yeast either.

Thoughts? Experiences?

I have used it twice and liked the results alot. One of the beers was an all simcoe double IPA and pitched 2 packs, fermentation was vigorous to say the least.

David, what love to hear your thoughts on this yeast. Haven’t given it a run yet.

Will do. I’m fermenting a bit cooler – 62 degrees, so I should get a pretty good picture.

I only tried it once, but I wasn’t thrilled with the results. The beer was good, just not what I was expecting. The yeast may or may not have been a factor.

I haven’t written it off yet though.

I read somewhere that this might be a dry version of Wyeast 1272. Anyone else think it is?

I don’t think so. I’ve used it once and it fermented dry, down to 1.010 in a pale. I don’t think 1272 goes that low typically. And it’s a slow starter. Did any of your guy’s beers start slow?

Everything that I’ve read about the yeast has come true thus far. Lag time was 24 hours +, but once it started, it was quite aggressive. I’m fermenting at 64 degrees right now, and will probably take a gravity sample at the end of the week. Smells quite fruity, although that might be a result of the columbus hops?

I’m betting it is. The beer I brewed with it was quite clean, that is of course until it got funky from the skanky gas line issue I was having. But it was a good yeast, fermented dry.

I’ve used it a couple of times and was very happy with the results. For me, the yeast was between 1056 and pacman, but closer to pacman.

J

Found this. It’s an interesting read:

http://www.rebelbrewer.com/blog/yeast-e ... n-session/

This article really showcases brewing and the sheer number of variables that one can introduce effecting the end result.

[quote=“holaday1185”]Found this. It’s an interesting read:

http://www.rebelbrewer.com/blog/yeast-e ... n-session/

This article really showcases brewing and the sheer number of variables that one can introduce effecting the end result.[/quote]

There are a few mangrove jack yeast I would like to try. Mainly Bohemian Lager Dry Yeast M84, British Ale Dry Yeast M07, and Newcastle Dark Ale Dry Yeast M03.

Having another dry lager to try is really the one I am the most interested in.

Yeah I have a packet of Saflager S-23 lager yeast. I’ve never used it before, and don’t know much about it.

I have two or three and probably won’t use them after hearing denny’s review of them.

You going to the meeting Saturday?

Yeah I read that. It’s always good to have dry on hand though. I think so — I might go out of town, but chances are I’ll stay and make the meeting.

I’ve used the Mangrove Jack hefe yeast, it’s decent. Didn’t ferment as dry as I expected, down to 1.016 in a 1.050 hefe. But it has a nice flavor. I’d be curious about the Bohemian lager yeast as well. I’m planning a helles very soon with the Saflager 34/70, heard that’s a decent yeast.

Do you still need that yeast? If so, I have some washed that you can build up.

Sidenote: I wasn’t the biggest fan of it. Very minerally imo. I am bringing a pale ale with it, you will see what I mean if you make it.

It is supposed to be ringwood, which a lot of people say can be a pain in the ass to deal with.

I like 34/70, I have used in on an oktoberfest and an american amber lager. Was happy with the results on both.

Yeah as of now bring it. That sounds great.

I like 34/70, I have used in on an oktoberfest and an american amber lager. Was happy with the results on both.[/quote]
Cool. Unfortunately I don’t have good German malt on hand, so it’ll be Rahr pilsner, which isn’t the same, I don’t think. But I’m sure it’ll still be a nice lager, going for a helles, step mashed 145F for 30, then step up to 158-160 for 45 minutes, then mash out. I’ve done that as a decoction before, but want to try it as a step mash with infusions.
Maybe the next time I make an order I’ll try out the Mangrove Jack Bohemian strain, I’m feeling a lager kick coming on and with the hot temps I don’t want to order liquid yeast.

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