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Bottle conditioning temp for an IPA

Would it be ok to bottle condition my Chinook IPA in my chest freezer ? I use the chest freezer to ferment in so it’s kept between 63-65 degrees. I have a carboy fermenting in it now and have plenty of extra room.

Are they carbed yet? If not then that is a little too low for bottle conditioning. If they are carbed it would be ok, but if you are trying to carb it and put some time on it, room temperature (70*-75*) would be better. It will eventually carb at 63-65 but it will take a lot longer.

Probably, but it would go kind of slow. What yeast did you use?

They haven’t carbed yet just bottled them tonight. I used safale us-05. My other option is a room that stays in the low to mid 80’s would that be better than carbing them in mid 60’s ?

Thanks for the quick replies !!

I’ve done this for a few weeks before, which led to fast carbonation and no off flavors that I picked up on. I wouldn’t trust that temperature for long term storage, though.

If it were me, I’d do it in the 60s and if you start to get impatient, move a few of them into the warm room.

I routinely bottle condition in the 80’s. It makes for faster carbonation. After 2 weeks I’ll chill a bottle for a couple of days and see if it’s done. If so, they all go into the fridge.

it will definitely take longer, but if you’re worried about it, you can always flip the bottles upside down once a day to keep the yeast from all settling, might help speed it up a little, but probably not much.

[quote=“CobiaTower”]They haven’t carbed yet just bottled them tonight. I used safale us-05. My other option is a room that stays in the low to mid 80’s would that be better than carbing them in mid 60’s ?

Thanks for the quick replies !![/quote]

S-05 will carb in the 60s, it’ll just take a bit longer.

Man you guys are a great help. THANKS !!

Howdy all,

I bottled some beer last night that I’m hoping will be ready by Sunday or Monday at the latest (brewed it for a beach vacation that starts on Saturday). I’ve actually had decent luck with beer carbing in a week when temps are in the mid-70s, but obviously it doesn’t happen reliably.

So, I’m thinking about moving the beers to the garage for a few days, but it’s supposed to get up into the 90s, possibly as high as 100, throughout the week. Is that a recipe for disaster? Has anyone carbed beer at temps that high?

The yeast is US-05.

[quote=“ickyfoot”]Howdy all,

I bottled some beer last night that I’m hoping will be ready by Sunday or Monday at the latest (brewed it for a beach vacation that starts on Saturday). I’ve actually had decent luck with beer carbing in a week when temps are in the mid-70s, but obviously it doesn’t happen reliably.

So, I’m thinking about moving the beers to the garage for a few days, but it’s supposed to get up into the 90s, possibly as high as 100, throughout the week. Is that a recipe for disaster? Has anyone carbed beer at temps that high?

The yeast is US-05.[/quote]
The closet I carbed in was probably in the 90’s late last summer. No ill effects from carbonating that high. I don’t know that I’d go into the 100’s though. Where would you have beer carbonating that hot? A garage?

Yeah, in my detached garage. I’ve never actually checked how the temps in there compare with outside temps…could be lower, could be higher, could be the same…heh.

[quote=“ickyfoot”]Howdy all,

I bottled some beer last night that I’m hoping will be ready by Sunday or Monday at the latest (brewed it for a beach vacation that starts on Saturday). I’ve actually had decent luck with beer carbing in a week when temps are in the mid-70s, but obviously it doesn’t happen reliably.

So, I’m thinking about moving the beers to the garage for a few days, but it’s supposed to get up into the 90s, possibly as high as 100, throughout the week. Is that a recipe for disaster? Has anyone carbed beer at temps that high?

The yeast is US-05.[/quote]

I believe it will carb up just fine. Here’s a question though: We all know ale yeast ferment for best flavor in the mid to upper 60’s, and that best flavor is preserved by keeping it cold after carbonation. So what’s your hurry? It will obviously carb in the 60’s because that’s the temperature it fermented. Why take the chance of any off flavor or stability problem to save a few days? I’d keep it cool, and RDWHAHB!!!

PS- I was answering generically to the whole thread. In your specific cercumstance of getting your beer ready for a party, I think warmer temps will get the job done. That said I wouldn’t go over 80 and the beer might still be “green”…

I’m more worried about 90+ degrees leading to off flavors, the beer going “bad”, or bottle bombs…

I think it will be OK as far as green-ness. The dry hop aroma was a little intense in the hydro sample, but it mellowed nicely over the course of an hour or so. Other than that it tasted more or less ready to go (not that it won’t be better in 3 weeks than it will be in 1).

Also, it’s not for a party, it’s for a 9-day beach trip. Ideally it will be ready at the beginning, but if it isn’t ready until midway through or towards the end, it’s all good. Maybe I’ll just throw a 6 pack out in the garage as an experiment :wink: .

I routinely carb up my brews at room temp (~72F in my house). They are generally drinkably carbed at 10 days and most-of-the-way done at 2 weeks.

One concern I would have about dry-hopped beer is that some of the more volatile hop oils have flash points as low as 79F. If your beer gets above that temp you run the risk of losing some of the delicate hop aroma from the dry hops.

Interesting…that’s enough for me to keep 'em inside and cross my fingers. Grazie!

First, there isn’t enough sugar for the yeast to consume that will produce off flavors. No worries there. From personal experience, I don’t think I’ve ever carbed beer under 75*F and typically they stay in the 80’s and haven’t had any issues with hop flavors, aroma, etc. being compromised. I’m gonna bet that after a week in the low 60’s, you’ll have sweet, flat beer for your party.

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