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Big Mouth Bubbler

Has anyone marked theirs for gallon grads.?
How far up side to mark gallons?
Save us the trouble if you have,
Thanks
I want to get mine calibrated before I break
it and it’s too late. :wink:

Just pour water in a gallon (or quart) at a time and mark the levels. There might be enough variation that someone else’s measurements could be off a little on yours.

Same here.
What did you mark it with? I got a marker/crayon at the hardware store that was supposedly good for glass, but didn’t work. I ended up using some of the wife’s nail polish.

The proper way to mark a container’s volume is by using weight.

One gallon of water is known to weigh 8.33 - 8.35 lbs. per gallon depending on temperature.

Fill a container with 8.34 lbs of cold tap water, pour it into the container that you wish to mark.

Mark the level of the water. Continue to add 8.34 lbs. of water and mark the container.

Relying on another persons marks may or may not be accurate, and all containers may vary slightly, so it’s probably best to mark each one individually.

[quote=“GeneticBrew”]The proper way to mark a container’s volume is by using weight.

One gallon of water is known to weigh 8.33 - 8.35 lbs. per gallon depending on temperature.

Fill a container with 8.34 lbs of cold tap water, pour it into the container that you wish to mark.

Mark the level of the water. Continue to add 8.34 lbs. of water and mark the container.

Relying on another persons marks may or may not be accurate, and all containers may vary slightly, so it’s probably best to mark each one individually.[/quote]

I like that method. Good thinking!

wow, I never thought about that. Next time someone asks me my weight, I am going to say about 25 gallons…

I am all for accuracy here too. Maybe not nearly as anal as some posters on here are.
But am I not correct in saying that if you fill a 1 gallon container with cold tap water
it follows that it would weigh what a gallon of cold water SHOULD weigh?

I’m still confused why it’s difficult to just pour a gallon of water in the Bubbler and mark the water line. Then pour another gallon in and mark and so on. Weighing water seems like an unnecessary step. Unless you don’t trust the tool you are using to measure your gallon but that sounds like a completely different problem.

You’re right Mattnaik I only started this thread because I was too lazy to go thru the process.
I never thought about the possible variation in Big Mouth Bubblers. In my opinion weighing
the water is ridiculous.

[quote=“1tun”]I am all for accuracy here too. Maybe not nearly as anal as some posters on here are.
But am I not correct in saying that if you fill a 1 gallon container with cold tap water
it follows that it would weigh what a gallon of cold water SHOULD weigh?[/quote]

Most gallon containers hold more than a gallon; the marks on most containers are approximate, while on some containers there are no marks.

Where is the one gallon mark on a jug of water? It’s generally not marked, thus you would want to weigh one gallon of water and place the gallon mark on the jug.

Also, you may not have an accurate, high resolution scale to use.

The decision is yours, be as accurate as you determine is necessary.

Is this level of accuracy really necessary? Will being off by 8 or 16 ounces really make a difference? 16 ounces in 5 gallons is 2.5%. Even in science and engineering +/- 5% is generally acceptable. If you can hit +/-2.5% on your measurements I think you are in pretty good shape.

[quote=“GeneticBrew”][quote=“1tun”]I am all for accuracy here too. Maybe not nearly as anal as some posters on here are.
But am I not correct in saying that if you fill a 1 gallon container with cold tap water
it follows that it would weigh what a gallon of cold water SHOULD weigh?[/quote]

Most gallon containers hold more than a gallon; the marks on most containers are approximate, while on some containers there are no marks.

Where is the one gallon mark on a jug of water? It’s generally not marked, thus you would want to weigh one gallon of water and place the gallon mark on the jug.

Also, you may not have an accurate, high resolution scale to use.

The decision is yours, be as accurate as you determine is necessary.[/quote]

But then how would you know how to measure a gallon of water the first time in order to know the weight? :smiley:

BTW I am more joking then anything

Yes, you would be in pretty good shape. Someone else, on the other hand, may disagree.

The decision is yours, be as accurate as you determine is necessary.

[quote=“fullhousebrew”][quote=“GeneticBrew”][quote=“1tun”]I am all for accuracy here too. Maybe not nearly as anal as some posters on here are.
But am I not correct in saying that if you fill a 1 gallon container with cold tap water
it follows that it would weigh what a gallon of cold water SHOULD weigh?[/quote]

Most gallon containers hold more than a gallon; the marks on most containers are approximate, while on some containers there are no marks.

Where is the one gallon mark on a jug of water? It’s generally not marked, thus you would want to weigh one gallon of water and place the gallon mark on the jug.

Also, you may not have an accurate, high resolution scale to use.

The decision is yours, be as accurate as you determine is necessary.[/quote]

But then how would you know how to measure a gallon of water the first time in order to know the weight? :smiley:

BTW I am more joking then anything[/quote]

I know you’re joking :roll: when asked.

There’s a history to the origin (and standards) of all units of measure:

I’ll give one example.

I bought an eight gallon Megapot 1.2 from Northern Brewer.

These pots are pre-marked for volume.

After measuring the accuracy of the marks, I noticed they were all offset by an 1/8" (too low).

Perhaps it was done to keep the 8 gallon mark below the rim or lip of the pot (or the jig used to mark the pots is just not properly setup/calibrated).

This isn’t really a problem. When filling I just have to fill to 1/8" above the mark.

Now an 1/8" may not seem like a lot. In fact, for one gallon, it’s 0.07 gallons, which isn’t terrible.

If all of the marks were off then the error would multiply and for 8 gallons, you’d be off by about a half gallon.

What if your scales are off? You could measure a gallon jug of water and re-calibrate them. :twisted:
I am only kidding. I only have a small scale for weighing hops and salts so I will have to trust the old
water jug method.

I use a one gallon plastic water pitcher with marks for quarts on it. Close enough for gubmint work. I figure if I get something in the neighborhood of 5.25 gallons in the fermenter at a reasonably close OG it’s been a good brew day. So far it’s worked out.

First off, I am not in the “I need to be dead on correct” camp. I’m more in the I want to have the right amount, but I’m sure close enough is usually good enough camp.

But still - one other thought…

Lets say you take the big mouth bubbler (or even the old better bottles or even glass carboys) and put that onto a scale, then began to add water at 1 gallon increments to mark each gallon up to 5 gallons.

When you come back later to use that big mouth’er (or better bottle or carboy) for actual fermentation, won’t you have at least some trub and gunk etc that would take up part of that volume. thus leaving you actually short of the 5 gallons anyway of liquid? at least to some degree.

my point is a carboy filled and marked with JUSt water would not represent a water content of a carboy filled with wort.

and again, I am in the ‘eh that looks close’ camp, so I don;t care that much, just tossing it out for discussion for fun

[quote=“fullhousebrew”]First off, I am not in the “I need to be dead on correct” camp. I’m more in the I want to have the right amount, but I’m sure close enough is usually good enough camp.

But still - one other thought…

Lets say you take the big mouth bubbler (or even the old better bottles or even glass carboys) and put that onto a scale, then began to add water at 1 gallon increments to mark each gallon up to 5 gallons.

When you come back later to use that big mouth’er (or better bottle or carboy) for actual fermentation, won’t you have at least some trub and gunk etc that would take up part of that volume. thus leaving you actually short of the 5 gallons anyway of liquid? at least to some degree.

my point is a carboy filled and marked with JUSt water would not represent a water content of a carboy filled with wort.

and again, I am in the ‘eh that looks close’ camp, so I don;t care that much, just tossing it out for discussion for fun[/quote]

Isn’t this why you actually make (fill the carboy with) 5.25 - 5.5 gallons? To account for trub, fermentation/racking loss?

A gallon of wort vs. a gallon of water? Meh, a gallon is a gallon, but they would weigh differently.

[quote=“1tun”]What if your scales are off? You could measure a gallon jug of water and re-calibrate them. :twisted:
I am only kidding. I only have a small scale for weighing hops and salts so I will have to trust the old
water jug method.[/quote]

Yea, pretty much what I alluded to in one of my previous posts, if you don’t have an accurate scale then it’s probably not worth weighing. OTOH, someone with an accurate scale may be more concerned with accuracy :wink:

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