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Batch saved!

Well I had a batch that was not carbonated and with a stop by NB and walking out with some yeast this batch is now saved after 11 days with the re yeasting !

Thank you to the guy behind the counter for the proper yeast and helping me save a batch.

That is awesome.

I had to do this recently with a IIPA that I let sit for a while in the secondary which I guess exhausted the initial yeast. I waited about three months at optimal temps before deciding to go the re-yeasting route for the first time. Glad it worked for both of us!

What beer was it?

[quote=“mplsbrewer”]I had to do this recently with a IIPA that I let sit for a while in the secondary which I guess exhausted the initial yeast. I waited about three months at optimal temps before deciding to go the re-yeasting route for the first time. Glad it worked for both of us!

What beer was it?[/quote]
It was a home recipe called 100% evil IPA. In fact I just drank one :slight_smile: .

What do you mean by this?

Did you not use the “correct” strain for the style?

What do you mean by this?

Did you not use the “correct” strain for the style?[/quote]

I used the proper yeast, but for some reason I had no carbonation. So I went into NB and asked what I could do. They gave some more yeast and I popped open every bottle and dropped some in. Then in 2 weeks I had carbonation. I don’t believe the additional yeast changed the taste either which was a concern.

Right on, the thing I was eluding to was a wonder if they prescribed a wine yeast called EC1187/ champagne for the process?
Many LHBS commonly do this as a default for stuck beer and wine alike and I dismiss the process quite abundantly as its not needed and detrimental to flavor/ aromas in many cases. Anybody fancy a chardonnay fermented halfway with estery/fusely EC1187? (heard this prescribed in person at a brew n grow once.)
An average dry ale yeast will solve your exact issue in 90% of cases and I have to think the fine lady’s/ gents at NB are recommending ale yeast. Depending on the actual wort environment and then if too hostile other methods are highly advantageous to the old EC1187 “trick”. I know all you die hard old school BW makers have your opinions on this topic, so whatever if you need to be heard also so be it. Bottom line is their are better ways.

[quote=“ITsPossible”]Right on, the thing I was eluding to was a wonder if they prescribed a wine yeast called EC1187/ champagne for the process?
Many LHBS commonly do this as a default for stuck beer and wine alike and I dismiss the process quite abundantly as its not needed and detrimental to flavor/ aromas in many cases. Anybody fancy a chardonnay fermented halfway with estery/fusely EC1187? (heard this prescribed in person at a brew n grow once.)
An average dry ale yeast will solve your exact issue in 90% of cases and I have to think the fine lady’s/ gents at NB are recommending ale yeast. Depending on the actual wort environment and then if too hostile other methods are highly advantageous to the old EC1187 “trick”. I know all you die hard old school BW makers have your opinions on this topic, so whatever if you need to be heard also so be it. Bottom line is their are better ways.[/quote]
Red Star champagne yeast :wink:

LOL too funny, glad your assistant didn’t stray from status quo.

This phenomenon never fails to surprise me, As mentioned above a sachet of US-05 would have been more than enough for this task, EC1118 is overkill and not alone the fact that it is a known ester/fusel bomb it adds a yeast bite quality that has to be filtered out in the commercial wine world. I personally recommended a solution called an encapsulated yeast meant for a extreme high gravity icewine stuck ferment along with acid adjustment before reyeasting, Well the commercial winemaker disagreed and used EC1118 because of this long standing “trick” used in his homebrewing days, long story short he completely wrecked over $5,000 worth of Canadian must it was super fuselly and the yeast bite was terrible although the bite filtered out the esters were now set. The flick of grains added to reyeast are not the gloom and doom I forecast but overtime you will notice a finish quality that is not quite all “there” and “lingers” in a bad way, but it sounds as though you will be drinking this in the near term so Ill subdue the warm feelings I have for this practice/yeast. Bottom line why do it? If their is a better way?

Garret, I am of course speaking to the herds that advocate this yeast blindly, you are just an innocent bystander.

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