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Barley Wine recipe help

So here is my recipe so far, it’s an adaptation of an older recipe i found a while back. Now my problems are this, how do I get this to yield 4 gallons, do I need to add liquid malt at all, if so how ('im new to liquid malt), and i’m also new to irish moss, why would I add it? or can I just skip it. Half of this beer will be siphoned into an American white oak bourbon barrel to age for a while and the rest will be bottle conditioned.

9# liquid malt (less or more) Yield 4 Gallons
Desired ABV 11%
4oz victory crystal 40 Desired IBU 75
4oz crystal 140
4 oz munich (toasted)

wait 30 minutes
Other ingredients:
3 oz simcoe hops 4ea vanilla bean
after 30 minutes 2 each toasted orange peel
2 oz centennial hops 3oz molasis
wait 20 minutes
1oz cascade hops

after boil
2 oz simcoe

add irishmoss (how much?)

yeast
Safale US-05 or Pacman

Liquid malt is your sugar content. With out it you would have a beer in the 1% range or less.
By my calculations, as written the beer will be in the 8-9% range. Add 2lb of table sugar to get it to 10-11%. That will also help the beer finish with a lower SG.

To get it to yield 4 gallons, boil as much as you can, then add enough cold water to bring it up to 4 gallon in the fermenter.

Depending on the actual AA’s of the hops, you may need to adjust the quantities. You can enter the recipe into a calculator to determine that.

This is my take on what your recipe says.

Yield 4 Gallons
Desired ABV 11%
Desired IBU 75

Steep in 1-1.5 gallons of water at 150* for 15-20 minutes.
4oz victory crystal 40
4oz crystal 140
4 oz Munich (toasted)

Remove a rinse with 1g of hot water (150-160*)

9# liquid malt
3oz molasses
2lb sugar

Add 1/2 the liquid malt at the beginning of the boil and enough water to fit your pot. Heat extra water in a separate pot while steeping the grain to speed things up.

Add the remainder of the LME, molasses and sugar at the end of the boil.

60 Minute boil
3 oz simcoe hops @ 60 minutes
2 oz centennial hops @ 30 minutes
irishmoss 1oz @ 10 minutes.
1oz cascade hops @ 10 minutes.
2 oz simcoe @ flame out.

Other ingredients after fermentation:
4ea vanilla bean
2 each toasted orange peel

yeast
Safale US-05 or Pacman

Thank you so much for that. That really makes a lot more sense. I am a beginning home brewer, as i’m sure you can tell, I really appreciate the help. I know is a bit ambitious for a newbie, I want to prove to myself I can do this.

now after going over your suggestions, the second part does confuse me a bit. If I start my boil w 1.5 G water, and then transfer that once it’s all done to my 4 G carboy, if I add 2.5 G more of cold water, would I not worry about diluting the beer? Would it be better to just skip that step and use a 5 or 6 gallon pot for the boil? Or am I looking for more it to be super concentrated so I can control the strength or it when I ferment it?

and the AA of the hops are as follows Simcoe 13.7%, centennial 9% and cascade 5.2%.

In my above example, I have you steep the grain in 1.5g of water. Rinsing them with an additional gallon of water. After adding the extract, molassis and sugar, you will have a super concentrated wort that would make a 20% beer. If the yeast could ferment that much.

So you need to add the additional water to bring the sugar content down to the 11% range. Which is still pushing the limits of beer yeast.

With 2.5 gallons of water (steep and rinse) and ~1.5g of extract you have 4 gallons of liquid. Minus loss for evaporation during the boil. Then you add cold water to bring back up to 4 gallons.

If you have the ability to boil 5 gallons, by all means do so. That can be difficult to do on most home stove tops. You also have to consider how you will cool it down. Adding cold water to bring the volume up to 4 gallons speeds up the cooling process.

To get the IBU to 75, I come up with these numbers.

Size: 4 gal
Efficiency: 75.0%
Attenuation: 75.0%

Original Gravity: 1.103
Color: 14.77 (8.0 - 15.0)
Alcohol: 10.28%
Bitterness: 72.1

Ingredients:
4 oz (2.1%) Crystal 40 - added during mash
4 oz (2.1%) Crystal Malt 120°L - added during mash
4 oz (2.1%) Munich Malt - added during mash

9 lb (75.4%) Liquid Light Extract - added during boil
3 oz (1.6%) Molasses
2.0 lb (16.8%) Corn Sugar

.5 oz (12.5%) Simcoe® (13.7%) - added during boil, boiled 60 m
1 oz (25.0%) Centennial (9%) - added during boil, boiled 30 m
1 oz (25.0%) Cascade (5.2%) - added during boil, boiled 10 m
1.5 oz (37.5%) Simcoe® (13.7%) - added at flame out or dry hop

Results generated by BeerTools Pro 1.5.24

wow. That makes a whole lot more sense. Thank you very much. For this high strength beer, what yeast would be strong enough?

1056 is listed to go to 11%. US-05 is a similar strain in dry form. I think you will need to really baby them to get it that high.

One hurdle you have is using extract, which sometimes have problems with higher FG on normal beers (5-6%). Making it a 11% beer will compound that. Which is way I put the sugar in the recipe instead of more LME/DME.

If I was to make this beer, I would use 2 packs of the dry yeast. Rehydrating them. Keeping fermentation temps in the mid 60’s for the first 3 days. Then adding the sugar/molasses. Waiting another day and then bringing the temps up to the low 70’s.

With a little luck you might get the gravity down to 1.020. But don’t hold your breath.

Possible other liquid yeast strains in order of alcohol tolerance: 1728, 1084, 1450, 1332, 1272.

From White Labs, maybe WLP065, 70, 78, 90, and some of the Belgian strains. But then you get into different flavor profiles.

With the liquids, I would suggest a making a low gravity beer of 2-3 gallon size to grow a larger quantity of yeast. Or buying 4 packages.

You could also add a package of champagne yeast after the sugar additions to try to get a more complete fermentation. But you may still not get below the 1.020 range.

[quote=“Nighthawk”]1056 is listed to go to 11%. US-05 is a similar strain in dry form. I think you will need to really baby them to get it that high.

[quote]

I’ve read posts from brewers claiming up to 15%. My first barleywine was a 12%er with 1056.

[quote=“Rookie L A”][quote=“Nighthawk”]1056 is listed to go to 11%. US-05 is a similar strain in dry form. I think you will need to really baby them to get it that high.
[/quote]

I’ve read posts from brewers claiming up to 15%. My first barleywine was a 12%er with 1056.[/quote]

AG or extract?

[quote=“Nighthawk”][quote=“Rookie L A”][quote=“Nighthawk”]1056 is listed to go to 11%. US-05 is a similar strain in dry form. I think you will need to really baby them to get it that high.
[/quote]

I’ve read posts from brewers claiming up to 15%. My first barleywine was a 12%er with 1056.[/quote]

AG or extract?[/quote]

I don’t remember for sure, but probably AG. My 12%er was all grain.

I would ditch the vanilla bean and orange peel personally, especailly if you are barrel aging. You want to taste the beer not the spices.

+1 to this. Especially with oak. One of the processes that happens when wood aging is the low pH of the beer hydrolizes some of the compounds in the wood. Ligins in the wood become phenols like vanillin, so you should have plenty of vanilla character from the oak. And IMHO, citrus doesn’t belong in a BW.

Also, Nighthawk is giving you great advice. I would suggest adding the sugar by the following method:
-brew your beer as normal without the sugar
-after the fermentation has started (maintaining a BEER temp in the mid-high 60’s), around day 2 of vigorous airlock activity, boil a liter of water (you may need more with 2 lbs of sugar, I’m not sure about solubility) to sanitize
-dump in 2lbs of sugar into the boiled water, stir, dissolve, cover, and chill in the sink in an ice bath
-add this to the beer as its fermenting

This will help make sure the yeast chew on the complex sugars in the wort prior to the simple sugars in…well, the sugar.

Good luck. By the looks of things, you are planning on long-term aging at least a portion of this. Phenomenal idea. Drinking young barleywine is nothing more than cheating your future self a year from now out of awesome barleywine.

Thank you to all of you! This is great advice and i really appreciate it. This beer will be amazing (thanks to all your help), and great test on patience :slight_smile:

What do you folks think about me adding Sake yeast? I want a yeast that will hold up a high ABV.

AG or extract?[/quote]

I don’t remember for sure, but probably AG. My 12%er was all grain.[/quote]

I also used brown sugar to boost the gravity a bit.

[quote=“Devonben87”]Thank you to all of you! This is great advice and i really appreciate it. This beer will be amazing (thanks to all your help), and great test on patience :slight_smile:

What do you folks think about me adding Sake yeast? I want a yeast that will hold up a high ABV.[/quote]

There’s no need to add sake, champagne, or wine yeast to any beer. S-05 will do the job as long as you pitch enough.

and hold up at 12% ABV?

Yes, I read a post recently on a different forum that claimed 17%.

well. if that’s the case, then with US-05 what would be the amount I would need for a 4 gallon batch? and no i don’t have a stir starter or an earl meyer flask but at some point i will look into getting one. just not right now.

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