Back in the comfort zone

Been doing some experimental batches recently, and decided to make these very small as I figured it was likely I wouldn’t want to drink large amounts of the failures. So went with 5 liters instead of my usual 20. What a PITA. I kept missing my numbers, having to make adjustments on the fly, etc.

Yesterday after brewing two experiments (one mash, wort split into two boil with different hops and yeast) I brewed 5 gallons of lambic. And that one hit every number on the nose.

I always knew process is tightly tuned to equipment, but this just brought home how tightly tuned it is to batch size as well.

So you did 10 liters total? That would be a nice size for BIAB.

this should be something the more experienced brewer need to do. I haven’t tried, or challenged myself in quite a while. I always seem to be changing something out and then it seems like throwing a dart at the board. Consistency and great tasting beer seem to be the holy grail of home-brews! I’ve only dabbled in 10 gallon batches. Now I have 5 different brews that I can do with repeat success. So how will this batch size affect my next step to 10 gallon batches? Sneezles61

Yes, I was thinking about doing that, but then I went and tried to reduce the number of variables by batch sparging in my usual method.

Yes, I was thinking about doing that, but then I went and tried to reduce the number of variables by batch sparging in my usual method.[/quote]

I can understand that. I did some BIAB brews over the winter but I’m still not convinced there is no difference than traditional mashing. Only one of the beers was a tried and true recipe which did come out a little different. Maybe do a BIAB first to see if it’s something you might like and then brew it again full batch and try to improve it.