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Need quick awnser- I brewer an IPA yesterday, pitched yeast about 6 pm and 3 hours later realized I had forgotten to inject oxygen in the wort, I shook it for about 3 min but don’t think that was enough, this morning it is chugging away. Is there a way to add more oxygen at this point. I have heard of using olive oil.

At this point, I think I would leave it alone, especially if it’s showing signs of active fermentation. As long as you pitched an adequate dose of healthy yeast you should be fine.

What yeast did you use? It’s not really necessary with dry yeast.
Using olive oil now would not do anything except maybe give you olive oil beer.

I agree with those above, if it looks active, just let it be. There is a chance that it might finish high, but it is more likely that the yeast will get the job entirely done. They’ll just be pooped by the end of it. Don’t plan on harvesting and reusing yeast from this batch.

The yeast was Windsor and is chugging away vigoursly. Thank you for your replies, I will leaveit alone.

What is the olive oil supposed to do? I’m genuinely curious, as I am pretty new to brewing too and haven’t read anything about it. :oops:

+1 on the curiousity. Under what situation would olive oil help a beer?

during the aerobic phase of fermentation, yeast synthesize unsaturated fatty acids to strengthen their cell walls. One way they can do this is by giving them oxygen, so they will create and strengthen these cell walls during this phase. If the brewer actually GIVES the yeast the unsat fatty acid (olive oil), they can use these acids and don’t need oxygen.

From what I heard, New Belgium tried this for a few batches and bailed on it. My understanding is that through PROVIDING the yeast with the UFA’s, the yeast will increase ester production, which was not what they wanted. May be worth trying in a saison or something (though I wouldn’t want to risk a whole batch). The other benefit I heard is it somehow increases the flavor stability of the beer, probably by increasing the stability of the yeast (stronger cell walls?)

FWIW, I think for a 5-gallon batch, the recommended dosage is a fraction of a fraction of a fraction of a ml of olive oil. Dip a sanitized toothpick in the olive oil, shake it off, and dip it in the wort.

^ This is exactly how I understand it as well - Very well put Pietro.

Although the theory makes sense, I don’t see how it could be practical on a homebrew scale. The olive oil will want to float in top of the wort without diffusing into it, as oil and water obviously don’t mix. I don’t see how the yeast would be able to make use of the fatty acids, as only the cells in direct contact with the pinpoint dot of oil would be able to make use of it, so how could you possibly transfer it to all the cells in the short amount of time before active fermentation, even if you had a way to circulate the liquid inside the vessel?

Maybe I’m way off base, but I just don’t see it working on our scales.

[quote=“porkchop”]^ This is exactly how I understand it as well - Very well put Pietro.

Although the theory makes sense, I don’t see how it could be practical on a homebrew scale. The olive oil will want to float in top of the wort without diffusing into it, as oil and water obviously don’t mix. I don’t see how the yeast would be able to make use of the fatty acids, as only the cells in direct contact with the pinpoint dot of oil would be able to make use of it, so how could you possibly transfer it to all the cells in the short amount of time before active fermentation, even if you had a way to circulate the liquid inside the vessel?

Maybe I’m way off base, but I just don’t see it working on our scales.[/quote]

This and the ‘increased ester production’ may simply be a result of the yeast stressing from…you know, NOT HAVING ANY OXYGEN!

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