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Anyone make fruit wine?

Tons of peaches this year anyone have a good fruit wine recipe

51% pils-based saison, 49% fresh peaches. Secondary on brett C. Not necessarily wine, but absolutely delicious!

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I bought a bottle of peach wine in Florida in the early 70’s. Never will try it again. Go with @porkchop recipe.

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13 lbs. of peaches
10 lbs. of sugar
1 tbsp. Yeast Energizer
1 tsp. Pectic Enzyme
2 ½ tbsp. Acid Blend
1 tsp. Wine Tannin
1 Packet of Wine Yeast: EC-1118
10 Campden Tablets (5 prior to fermentation and 5 at bottling time)
I like to peel my peaches take the pits out and any red from around the pit. Then slice them into thin slices. But you dont have to peel them. Boil around 5 gallons of water add the sugar and let it cool . Add peaches to the fermenter and the cooled sugar water add five campden tabs and the stuff above and let it set for 24 hours and then add your yeast. Let it ferment for 5 to 7 days then tranfer to secondary. Try to leave the peach and and other stuff behind. Leave in the secondary 4 to 6 weeks or untill it clears. Then at bottling time add the other 5 campden tabs.

It looks close to what I’m doing. Except I didn’t peel the peaches. I just blanched and peeled a ton of peaches that I froze so enough of that. My wife has been baking and I’ve gained some weight probably the neighbors also. I filled a 2 gallon fermenter with cut up peaches a lb of sugar and a lb of brown sugar 1 Camden tab and 1.7L boiling water and mashed. Tomorrow I’ll mash some more and add pectin nutrient and yeast. Don’t have acid blend so gonna add some lemon juice. How’s that sound @damian_winter

I’m betting I can make something better than what you bought.

I thought about doing a saison and I have a ton frozen to revisit that this winter. I also have 3
Lbs of frozen raspberries. I have a mulberry wine going and a peach Mead. Also a blackcurrant and honey schnapps. And a pear schnapps. This is crazy. Thank goodness most of my fruit is biennial

Although acid blend is little different than lemon juice you can use it i have when in a pinch. 2 1/2 table spoons should be enough. Or if your in no hurry you can add the acid blend later too when you get some . Generally it done doing primary fermentaion but some times the wine needs a little more after a taste or two.

I think what we bought was just for naive tourists as a souvenir.

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You know I’ve blended Pinot noir into my cherry saison got me thinking about blending some Mead or peaches wine into a saison. Any experience doing this

Haven’t tried blending mead, but Dupont makes a Biere de Miel that’s awfully tasty. You’d probably get something in that ballpark, once any sugars ferment out of it. I’ve blended gewürztraminer and homemade blackberry wine into saison and sour beers, and it adds a really nice touch. 1 bottle gives a nice hint, and 2 is pretty noticeable. Blending in the glass works well, too… A really old IPA perks up with a splash of something tannic, like chokecherry wine.

Back in July when peaches from down south became available up here, I did a 1 G batch of peach wine:
5 lb of peaches, pitted and sliced plus 1/2 box golden raisins. In a BIAB bag in a regular fermentation bucket. Treated with Camden tab, then 24 hours later added pectinase. Following day added 1 lb honey and 1 pint of white wine concentrate. plus a little acid blend and a pinch of tannin. 1 packet of Cote de Blanc yeast, and let her rip. OG was 1.095 if I remember right. After 2 weeks racked off the must into a 1G bottle and held back 1 pint in refrigerator for topoff purposes. I’ve racked it off the lees twice since and it’s looking like it’s time to bottle. Did a batch last year with only 3 lb. of peaches and while it is good, it’s a bit too much like mead. So this year I upped the peaches.

Also did 1G of Dandelion wine last year. Never again unless I pay some kids to harvest the dandelion blooms. 7 cups of dandelion blossums is ALOTof dandelions!

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I also have my fermenter line with a a strainer bag I was going to pull it and squeeze it out before adding the yeast. Is that what you did. I’m estimating I only used about 3lb peaches maybe a little bit more. Hopefully it’s enough. I guess I could add more.

No I kept it in the bag until primary fermentation was finished. It was just a mush left when I pulled it, but it made the racking easier- not as much sediment.
With 3 lb. I wasn’t getting much peach flavor, but I had the honey and the wine concentrate in there.

Well Im not adding honey so we’ll see where it goes it’s only a gallon batch. I’ll be bottling my peach Mead so it will be fun to compare

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I’m making fruit wine these days:

Finnviini

But I’ve never worked with peaches, they don’t grow this far north.

What you are planning on doing looks like it should work well, but I would leave the fruit in the fermentor during the first half to 3/4 of the fermentation. The alcohol will extract more flavor. Punch the fruit down daily to make sure it gets mixed well.

After fermentation give it a LOT of time to clarify, and consider using finings after a few months.

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I have the fruit in the fermenter but haven’t been punching it down. I’ll do that today if it’s still actively fermenting. I was going to rack it when the fruit drops

Garlic wine and beet wine that is interesting. I have raspberries saved and am going to do a raspberry wine I don’t have enough for an all juice though. I was going to make a one gallon batch with 5lbs raspberries. Do you add sugar. How much?

If it is going to be wine (>10% alcohol), you need to add sugar with any fruit except grapes or dates. Hard to say exactly how much sugar to add; it depends on how much is already in the fruit. You can take a refractometer reading from some of the juice, and calculate how much sugar is already present. Then add as much extra that you need until you get to the correct starting gravity. 1.090 is about right for normal strength 12% ABV wine.
Remember, wine typically has a FG between 0.992 and 0.996 when fermented dry.

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