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Am I extrating tannins with my dough in process?

After reading about some having issues with tannins. I started to wonder if my dough in method may be extracting tannins.
I usually use my mix stir to mix my grains to the water.
although I don’t think I am noticing any tannins, if it possible that the mix/stir could be extracting them when I add water for the second runnings on during my batch sparge?

Tannins are usually a mash pH issue (pH on the high side).

It’s not. What flavor evidence leads you to believe there is a problem with tannins?

It’s not. What flavor evidence leads you to believe there is a problem with tannins?[/quote]

I agree. You’re asking whether your tire inflation has anything to do with your busted left tail light.

In a hobby full of annoying, BS terms, that’s gotta be the worst, lately.

If it aight broken dont fix it.

In a hobby full of annoying, BS terms, that’s gotta be the worst, lately.[/quote]

What’s wrong with it? Makes perfect sense to me.

I thought tannins could be extracted from squeezing the grains???
Thought I had read numerous times that its okay to squeeze the hop bags after a boil but to never squeeze grains after a mash

[quote=“Roddy”]I thought tannins could be extracted from squeezing the grains???
Thought I had read numerous times that its okay to squeeze the hop bags after a boil but to never squeeze grains after a mash[/quote]No, tannins are extracted by high pH, not by mechanical handling - as long as you’re in the correct range, you could run the grain through a press and not get tannins in the wort.

In a hobby full of annoying, BS terms, that’s gotta be the worst, lately.[/quote]

Sorry if I offended your sensibilities, but who the hell are you, the syntax police? I am open to suggestions. If you have a better phrase for the situation please pass it on. :cheers:

High pH can be a contributor, but I find that a major contributor is oversparging. I chased my tail for a year regarding this issue. I was cutting off my final runnings at 2 Brix and had a hint of tannic astringency in those beers. I’ve since revised my cut off to 3 Brix and have not had any tannin problems.

PS: You can probably assume that my pH was not high :wink:

[quote=“Shadetree”][quote=“Roddy”]I thought tannins could be extracted from squeezing the grains???
Thought I had read numerous times that its okay to squeeze the hop bags after a boil but to never squeeze grains after a mash[/quote]No, tannins are extracted by high pH, not by mechanical handling - as long as you’re in the correct range, you could run the grain through a press and not get tannins in the wort.[/quote]

+1. I basically do run my grain through a press when I BIAB; I have a “strainer bucket”, which holds the bag and use one bucket below to collect, and another bucket above as the press. After a minute of sitting on the top bucket, I’ve extracted up to a gallon from the grains, and the grains are nearly dry. Never had a tannin problem.

[quote=“mabrungard”]High pH can be a contributor, but I find that a major contributor is oversparging. I chased my tail for a year regarding this issue. I was cutting off my final runnings at 2 Brix and had a hint of tannic astringency in those beers. I’ve since revised my cut off to 3 Brix and have not had any tannin problems.

PS: You can probably assume that my pH was not high :wink: [/quote]

When sparging, if the water is untreated, can’t the pH slowly rise? Isn’t this, then, a high pH due to over sparging problem? :wink:
Or…is there enough buffering capacity in a properly adjusted mash to not worry about the pH creeping up during the sparge?

[quote=“roffenburger”][quote=“mabrungard”]High pH can be a contributor, but I find that a major contributor is oversparging. I chased my tail for a year regarding this issue. I was cutting off my final runnings at 2 Brix and had a hint of tannic astringency in those beers. I’ve since revised my cut off to 3 Brix and have not had any tannin problems.

PS: You can probably assume that my pH was not high :wink: [/quote]

When sparging, if the water is untreated, can’t the pH slowly rise? Isn’t this, then, a high pH due to over sparging problem? :wink:
Or…is there enough buffering capacity in a properly adjusted mash to not worry about the pH creeping up during the sparge?[/quote]

Yes, absolutely.
I find that when my sparge PH is around 5.8-6 then the final running’s went up to around 5.8-6
So now I try to keep running’s level by keeping the sparge water around 5.6
I would have to think that if you have a high natural PH of 8.0+ the mash running’s would increase even farther than 6 for sure. This is a fly sparge op fyi, But I would assume batching falls in here somewhere also.

In that same vein if your post boil PH is high enough the final beer PH might be closer to 4.8-5.0+ which will invite infections/spoilage/degradation over time quicker than a “normal” lower PH beer of 4.2-4.6

[quote=“Shadetree”][quote=“Roddy”]I thought tannins could be extracted from squeezing the grains???
Thought I had read numerous times that its okay to squeeze the hop bags after a boil but to never squeeze grains after a mash[/quote]No, tannins are extracted by high pH, not by mechanical handling - as long as you’re in the correct range, you could run the grain through a press and not get tannins in the wort.[/quote]

Actually, several commercial breweries use a mash press on the grains after the mash.

[quote=“mabrungard”]High pH can be a contributor, but I find that a major contributor is oversparging. I chased my tail for a year regarding this issue. I was cutting off my final runnings at 2 Brix and had a hint of tannic astringency in those beers. I’ve since revised my cut off to 3 Brix and have not had any tannin problems.

PS: You can probably assume that my pH was not high :wink: [/quote]

Or you could batch sparge and not worry about it! :wink:

[quote=“Denny”][quote=“mabrungard”]High pH can be a contributor, but I find that a major contributor is oversparging.[/quote]Or you could batch sparge and not worry about it! :wink:

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