Altbier Idea

For our last run of lagers, I started with a satchet of 34/70 and brewed a pretty simple steam beer fermented at about 60* for 4 days, then 70*. This gave us about 1000ml of pure slurry which we used for a 1/2 bbl of German pils, then about 2000ml of that slurry was used for a doppelbock.

Could I do the same thing (ie ‘hybrid’ fermentation), with some German hops, a few more caramel malts, and an altbier recipe?

Hell yeah. Maybe try WLP029, it is supposedly very clean even above 70 F.

How did the 34/70 do at warm temps? Pretty clean? Or strange fruity esters? A lot of sulfur? Anything odd?

It made a great steam at 60*, then ramped up, I would definitely do that again. Grain bill was 90% briess pale ale then 10% light munich. I had done this once before with 2206 to make a steam (but it was Jamil’s steam which has a whole mess of malts in it, which would have likely covered up yeast character). Not sure I’m brave enough to try it with a non-floccing kolsch yeast (!). FWIW turned the steam around in about 10 days, grain to glass with a quick carb.Will push the bittering and flavor hops a tad more. as there was some fruity character from the yeast that dominated a bit.

I would think that by fermenting warmer, lager yeasts would in general have less sulfur left in the beer since it is blown off so much more vigorously.

I find it interesting that so many people think a lager fermented warm is a “steam” beer. recent info I’ve seen suggests that Anchor steam yeast is not actually a lager or “hybrid” yeast but and ale yeast.

Denny, I imagine only 0.1% of homebrewers are aware of that latter statement, if true. I wasn’t aware, not specifically anyway, although I can’t say I am surprised either. And I read a lot… I mean, a LOT. Interesting if true – I don’t doubt that it may be true.

Denny, I imagine only 0.1% of homebrewers are aware of that latter statement, if true. I wasn’t aware, not specifically anyway, although I can’t say I am surprised either. And I read a lot… I mean, a LOT. Interesting if true – I don’t doubt that it may be true.[/quote]

Right. My understanding is that in Gold Rush-era CA, german/bavarian immigrant brewers had their traditional yeast (why I used 2206 the first time), but not access to refrigeration or cold-fermenting capability.

Killians Irish Red is now brewed as a lager, does that mean Irish Red is a lager style now?

[quote=“Pietro”]Right. My understanding is that in Gold Rush-era CA, german/bavarian immigrant brewers had their traditional yeast (why I used 2206 the first time), but not access to refrigeration or cold-fermenting capability.

Killians Irish Red is now brewed as a lager, does that mean Irish Red is a lager style now?[/quote]

If they use a lager yeast, then it is a lager. Apparently, Anchor switched yeast in the 1970s.

FWIW, this is the source I was quoting…https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/ … #msg318249

[quote=“Denny”]

If they use a lager yeast, then it is a lager. [/quote]

That’s not what I asked. I asked (rhetorically) if Coors happens to use lager yeast to brew a beer they market as an Irish Red Ale, does it make the category of Irish Red a lager? The answer to that is ‘no’, which is why I call my beer a steam or cal common.

[quote=“Pietro”][quote=“Denny”]

If they use a lager yeast, then it is a lager. [/quote]

That’s not what I asked. I asked (rhetorically) if Coors happens to use lager yeast to brew a beer they market as an Irish Red Ale, does it make the category of Irish Red a lager? The answer to that is ‘no’, which is why I call my beer a steam or cal common.[/quote]

Got it