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AG Pilsner

Well, I just brought my AG Pilsner to 64 degrees for its D-rest, after 4 weeks at 52 degrees. I’m going to leave at that temp for 6 days, then put it in secondary and take it down to 40. I’m thinking 4 weeks at that temp. Any thoughts?

Paul

If it needs a d-rest, it can be done sooner than 4 weeks. I usually let my pilsners ferment for about 10-14 days then slowly raise them up from 48-50F to 64ish over about a week. I’ll bump the temp up about 1 or 2 degrees a day. Then let it sit for a day or two. But no big deal.

I like to lager my lagers for no less than 4 weeks, but the longer you can hold out the better. I would recommend 8-10 weeks. But again, no big deal. It will still taste good after 4 weeks, but even better at 8-10. You can also drop that lagering temp lower if possible. Down to the low to mid 30’s

My little fridge only goes down to 40. :frowning:
I have to go with that until I can get an extra chest freezer and controls.

[quote=“paultuttle”]My little fridge only goes down to 40. :frowning:
I have to go with that until I can get an extra chest freezer and controls.[/quote]

It’s no problem. 40F will still work.

What gravity, what yeast, what’s the gravity now?

The typical German rule of thumb is to lager one week per degree Plato.

My OG was 1.052. I’ll let you know what it is when I rack to secondary on Wednesday. I used Wyeast 2007 with a 1L starter.

How did you do your starter?
1L for a lager is on the small side
Check out Jamil’s website www.mrmalty.com for info on making starters and how big.

Sounds like it’ll work. My pils does a month approx 56f then a d-rest @ approx 65f fot 10 days then legged for cold crash at 40*f for two weeks before tapping.

[quote=“TG”]How did you do your starter?
1L for a lager is on the small side
Check out Jamil’s website http://www.mrmalty.com for info on making starters and how big.[/quote]

I boiled 1 L of water with 1/2 cup DME. All I have is a 1L Erl. flask. I cooled it to 75 deg. and pitched the yeast. I usually do this 24 hours before I brew. I’ve been doing starters like this for about 6 months now. I’ve thought about using a 1 Gal wine jug I have, but haven’t done it yet.

OK, I just checked the website, and it says I would need more than 3 L of starter. How do you do that with 5 Gallons of wort and still have head room? Or do you only brew 4.25 gallons of wort?

Did you use a stirplate? That will increase the yeast count a lot.

Let the starter finish and settle out. When it’s done put it in the fridge which will quicken the yeast flocculation. Then pour off the liquid and use only the yeast on the bottom. (Keep a little of the liquid to swirl the yeast into suspension.)

Go buy a cheap gallon of wine and you’ll get a free gallon growler for bigger starters.

:cheers:

[quote=“TG”]Did you use a stirplate? That will increase the yeast count a lot.

Let the starter finish and settle out. When it’s done put it in the fridge which will quicken the yeast flocculation. Then pour off the liquid and use only the yeast on the bottom. (Keep a little of the liquid to swirl the yeast into suspension.)

Go buy a cheap gallon of wine and you’ll get a free gallon growler for bigger starters.

:cheers: [/quote]

+1. Always use Mr. Malty to calculate your starter size. Type of beer, yeast strain, age of yeast, wort volume, and OG are all factors in how big of a starter to make. If making a 1L starter, I don’t bother cooling and decanting. Others do, but I don’t. Anything bigger than that, I let the starter ferment out (24-48hrs) then put it in the fridge to cold crash (24-72hrs) then decant the spent wort and pitch just the yeast. Start thinking about making your starters a few days before brewing and not just the day before.

I don’t have a stir plate(Not yet, anyway). I just give it a “swirly”, every time I walk by. I will try making bigger starters and make them earlier in the week. I really do appreciate all the advice.

Paul

That helps a lot.

I just checked the price of a stir plate on NB. Damn. Gonna have to wait on that.

On putting the starter in the fridge, I guess I’m missing the point there. I don’t quite understand the reasoning behind it.

You put the starter in the fridge after it’s fermented out to get the yeast to drop. Then decant (pour off) the liquid so you only toss the yeast into your beer.

A stir plate can be had for under $25. A fan from a computer: $5 from the recycle shop. Hard drive magnet: $5 from recycle shop. A cell charger: free, everyone has an old one laying around. Project box

from Radio Shack: $10. Misc nuts and bolt to mount the fan.

Hey Paul, The method I spoke to earlier this week linked below for stir plate building is the most surefire way to cobble together a sound stirplate without trying to mate all kinds of components that may take some head scratching.

viewtopic.php?f=26&t=110053#p970625

Then what do you do? How does just a straight power source “start” a stir bar without throwing it?

If you search the internets you can find stir plates for much less then our host sells them for. I bought mine for $30.

The yeast flocculates more quickly in the cold. Then you can pour off most of the liquid, swirl up the yeast and pitch all of the yeast with a minimum of the starter liquid.

I just racked it to secondary. The gravity was 1.012. It’s now in the beer fridge at 40 degrees for the next month or 2. It tasted really great, so I think I’m on the right track.

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