3 or 5 gallon

Apartment brewer, 3 gallon batches. Getting a new 5 cf chest freezer tomorrow and am trying to decide what size kegs I want. I like the idea of a 3 gallon setup, kegs are new, matches my batch size, etc. But I’m torn because of the price difference. Initially, I am planning on 2 taps. If I did a 3rd, it would have to be 3 gallon on the compressor hump of the freezer. Thoughts? Anyone else doing 3 gallon batches in 5 gallon kegs? Pros/cons?

5 gallons. If you decide to do bigger batches you are set. Get them 1st.

And 3 gallons. Good for taking on the road where you don’t think 5 gallons will be consumed. If you stumble on some used (ebay) for a good price, pick up 1-2.

Scalability is almost always the right answer IMO, so 5 gallons.

[quote=“Nighthawk”]
And 3 gallons. Good for taking on the road where you don’t think 5 gallons will be consumed. If you stumble on some used (ebay) for a good price, pick up 1-2.[/quote]
How do you ensure you’re not dispensing glasses full of yeast after transporting a keg? Do you filter?

If you rack gently off the secondary into the keg there will be minimal yeast. Another way is to jumper beer from one keg to another after it has had time to settle out and then take that keg with you on the road. A jumper is merely a short piece of bev line with a beer QD on each end. Perform a closed system transfer with CO2 pushiung beer from one keg to the other.

What about purging the head space with 3 gallons of beer in a 5 gallon keg? Does that burn through the gas quickly enough to be a bother?

[quote=“bunderbunder”]What about purging the head space with 3 gallons of beer in a 5 gallon keg? Does that burn through the gas quickly enough to be a bother?[/quote]i don’t think it uses much gas at all. The co2 is heavier so it blankets the beer and the air goes out as you fill.

You can put 3 gallons in a 5 gallon keg, so that is what I would go with. However, if you don’t see yourself moving up to 5 gallons smaller kegs will work.

Is it true that the poppet valves are not replaceable on the 3 gallon kegs? If one goes bad, do you just have to replace the whole post?

I don’t think so, but I don’t own a 3 gallon keg.

[quote=“ccyr”]Is it true that the poppet valves are not replaceable on the 3 gallon kegs? If one goes bad, do you just have to replace the whole post?[/quote]I have 5 of the three gallon kegs and they are identical to the taller 5 gallon kegs “poppet-wise”.

Ask yourself “How much beer do I actually drink and how fast”?

IMO…most beer I brew I feel is better in the short term so the less of it the better so it’s not “old” months from now and I’m still trying to finish off the last few bottles. Now with that said, some beers are just as good 6 months from now too…but will you be sick of them possibly :slight_smile:

Definitely go 3 in a 5 gallon keg. I brew 4 gallon batches, and keg in 5 gallon kegs obviously. I probably end up with a little less than 4 in the keg. But I tend to get sick of my beers pretty quickly, drinking the same ones day after day, even if it’s the best beer I’ve ever brewed and tastes awesome at first tapping. I look forward to the next beer being on tap. I should probably even scale it back to 3 gallons.
But there’s something cool about the 3 gallon kegs too. I don’t know that it’s really worth it though when you can get a 5 gallon keg for about the same price. What if you want to do 5 gallon batches in the future? I guess you could just pick up some 5 gallon kegs, use the 3 gallon ones for high gravity beers or something. Got me thinking now…