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3 beers-- 1 yeast

I’m going to take advantage of the winter beer kit sale. The three beers that I’ll
be ordering all use the same yeast. They call for a yeast starter. My thought is that I order one yeast for all them and save a few $$$. Please tell me if my thinking is correct.

  1. I make a starter and crash it in fridge. I can now decant and halve it to make two
    starters from it so I can brew two beers in one day.

  2. Take one of those and make another starter, crash, halve and have enough for three.

How is my thinking? Also, should I order DME or is there another way to go about
making a starter?

You could make a starter, crash, and decant. Brew your first beer, preferably lower OG, then split the yeast cake for the next two, or three.

As far as starter wort, DME is fine. If you brew AG, you can pull off wort when you lauter to freeze or can for later use. You will save $$$ by repitching yeast.
Keep everything sanitary. :cheers:

[quote=“mrv”]You could make a starter, crash, and decant. Brew your first beer, preferably lower OG, then split the yeast cake for the next two, or three.

As far as starter wort, DME is fine. If you brew AG, you can pull off wort when you lauter to freeze or can for later use. You will save $$$ by repitching yeast.
Keep everything sanitary. :cheers: [/quote]By far the simplest and least time consuming way to go. I do it all the time.

+1. I do this all the time. Watch the number of generations you go (say, around 5 max) and consider a little yeast nutrient along the way, but those a pretty minor issues…frankly, I think the yeast performs better after a couple generations and the taste improves. Maybe I am talking myself into that, but I find it true, even with dry yeasts.

Agree with all of the above, including the idea that the taste & performance of the yeast improves over generations. I routinely go up to 10 or 12 generations with no problems at all, and I used to go considerably more than that (I probably still could, but elect not to press my luck). But in my experience, 8 or 10 gens is not a problem, at all.
If you do attempt it, your sanitation just needs to be the best it can be at every step, through every generation.

Thanks guys for that information. Sorry I didn’t get back sooner. Definitely sounds
easier to do one beer and split the cake for the other two.

I just racked 15 gallons to the secondary and then I poured all the US-05 yeast slurry into a gallon Ziploc for tomorrow’s 22 gallons of Denny’s BVIP. It will save me 6-8 packages of US-05 tomorrow which equates to about $25 :cheers:

Washing the gunk from the bottom of the fermenter seems like a PITA to me. I do something similar to your first scenario:

1.5L starter with the yeast. Let it ferment out, then cold crash and decant. reserve half the slurry a capped bottle and pitch another 1.5L starter wort on top of the remaining. Ferment out, crash, decant, pitch.

When it is time for beer #2 I repeat the above procedure using the slurry saved in the bottle instead of the smack pack. I’ve done this for about 3 generations when I start to worry about contamination. $6.50 for a yeast pack isn’t all that much…I think $2/batch for yeast is awesome and don’t press my luck.

+1 on the gallon ziplock, Mullerbrau. I store that way for ease and have had no problems whatsoever.

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