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15% Carared is not red

Just wanted to throw it out there that 15% carared does NOT give a red color to your beer. Looks like I just used a normal crystal 40L. This was in a RyePA that I just put on tap. One good note is that 20% rye malt definitely comes through will a nice spice note.

Enjoy.

Agreed. I once used CaraRed because I read online that it produced a deep, saturated red color. Not. For my Home Run Red Ale (or lager), I use base malt along with 8 ounces of C120 and 8 ounces of Special B. Deep red color with a great malt base.

+1 to good results with Special B

It’s only 24L, not sure why you would think that would get you a red color?

Um… maybe because it’s called ‘Carared’ and the description reads as follows

"20° L. Provides fuller body and imparts a deep, saturated red color, particularly to red ales and lagers, Scottish ales, bocks and altbiers. "

I would guess they got that from the Northern Brewer description.

Brother Ken, what would the percentage of each (120 & B) work out to your total of base malt. I ask b/c I’m working out a recipe with plenty of MO and want a nice deep red finish. They would be the only crystal’s used.
Thanks, Mike

Brother Ken, what would the percentage of each (120 & B) work out to your total of base malt. I ask b/c I’m working out a recipe with plenty of MO and want a nice deep red finish. They would be the only crystal’s used.
Thanks, Mike[/quote]
About 5% of each works well. My Home Run Red Ale (and lager) use 10 lbs of grain in a 5 gallon batch and I use 8 ounces of C120 and 8 ounces of Special B. So 5% of each and 10% total is crystal malt.

I have to say that in my quest for a nice red all-grain beer, I fell for that description as well. Deep, saturated red color kind of sounds like you might get deep, saturated red color. :lol:

Ok so I have a question for you guys. Frankly, I really don’t spend a whole bunch of time worrying about the color as long as I am in the right ballpark but; do you not get alot of dried fruit flavors and also possibly some roast aspects when using dark crystal malt and/or Special B? Perhaps I should be asking how much of that stuff can you add to a batch before you start seriously affecting the flavor of the beer? Also, I always thought that if you wanted a red beer just a touch (meaning maybe an ounce or two in a 5 gallon batch) of roast barley would get you there avoiding any of the afore mentioned issues.

I make a fair number of German type lagers and if I want them dark, I just add a bit of the dehusked carafa malt, works great. I would have to say though, you tend to get brown with that stuff as versus red (but in a Munich Dunkel or a Dunkel Bock that is exactly what I want). Generally speaking (and especially with lagers) I am looking to dry out the beer as much as possible so I am very wary of adding a bunch of crystal type malts to the grist. Maybe I’m just an old fart but seems like the older I get, the less I want “sweet beer”, dry and malty however really works really well for me.

[quote=“Barley Water”]Ok so I have a question for you guys. Frankly, I really don’t spend a whole bunch of time worrying about the color as long as I am in the right ballpark but; do you not get alot of dried fruit flavors and also possibly some roast aspects when using dark crystal malt and/or Special B? Perhaps I should be asking how much of that stuff can you add to a batch before you start seriously affecting the flavor of the beer? Also, I always thought that if you wanted a red beer just a touch (meaning maybe an ounce or two in a 5 gallon batch) of roast barley would get you there avoiding any of the afore mentioned issues.

I make a fair number of German type lagers and if I want them dark, I just add a bit of the dehusked carafa malt, works great. I would have to say though, you tend to get brown with that stuff as versus red (but in a Munich Dunkel or a Dunkel Bock that is exactly what I want). Generally speaking (and especially with lagers) I am looking to dry out the beer as much as possible so I am very wary of adding a bunch of crystal type malts to the grist. Maybe I’m just an old fart but seems like the older I get, the less I want “sweet beer”, dry and malty however really works really well for me.[/quote]
Some people say that they pick up a dried-fruit or raisiny flavor from darker crystals like this. There are times when I pick it up but it’s not really a huge part of the grain bill and I suppose it could depend on what you do with hops and how much character you get from the yeast you use. When I was an all-grain newbie, I tried to get a red beer with roasted barley, crystals, carared, etc. and I got ‘amber’, not ‘red’. My take on it is that Special B is the grain with the most red in it. Also, I don’t care for super-roasty flavors so the idea of getting ‘red’ with crystal malt appealed to me too. I have used only Special B and excluded the C120 and that will give you red as well, but not as dark. The C120 makes the beer darker and the Special B turns it red. Special B is a very dark grain and I believe that it comes in various °L ratings with 140 being pretty common. Cheers.

I’m trying the Homerun Red combo for the second incarnation of my Redheaded Rye-child for my next brew. The first time around I used an ounce or two of chocolate rye along with some crystal 80 and Carared (yep, I fell for it too. This is a horribly named malt) to get the color rating to 15 or so and it turned out more of a copper beer than a red one. In general I don’t really care much for color, but for this specific recipe I was looking for a Red Ale so I want a Red Ale. Hoping for good results.

I agree with you. I rarely make a beer based primarily on color. I look at what I want from the beer flavor-wise and the color is the color. But if you decide that you’re going to make a red ale or red lager, it’s a little unseemly for it not to be red. I used to brew a red lager from a kit when I was an extract brewer and I didn’t know what grains were steeped and I also didn’t know what went into making the amber extract ‘amber’. I did get a great red color from that kit but when I went all-grain, I was clueless. I must have tried 3 or 4 different times, experimenting with crystals, RB, chocolate and I kept getting “pale”, “amber” or “brown”. Cheers Beerheads.

[/quote] I used to brew a red lager from a kit when I was an extract brewer and I didn’t know what grains were steeped and I also didn’t know what went into making the amber extract ‘amber’. I did get a great red color from that kit but when I went all-grain, I was clueless.[/quote]

What extract was in the kit? Maybe the shop that sold the kit can tell you what went into the amber extract, or maybe the manufacturer can.

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